Tag Archives: Pet food

Primal Pet Foods Issues Recall of Raw Cat Food

 

Primal Pet Foods, a California-based pet food manufacturer, has announced the voluntary recall of a single lot of Feline Turkey Raw Frozen Cat Food due to reports of low thiamine levels in the food.

 

According to a department release, the FDA tested the product after receiving a consumer complaint concerning 3-pound bags of Primal Pet Foods Feline Turkey Raw Frozen Formula. After testing, the FDA notified Primal Pet Foods that the testing of two bags of this lot showed a low thiamine level.

 

The lot involved in the recall is:

 

Primal Pet Foods Feline Turkey Raw Frozen Formula 3-pound bag 

(UPC# 8 50334-00414 0) 

Best By date 060815 

Production Code – B22

 

Only the product with the above best-by date and production code is included in the cat food recall. Consumers are advised to check the production code on the back of the Primal Pet Foods bag to determine if the product has been recalled.

 

Cats fed diets low in thiamine for an extended period may be at risk for developing a thiamine deficiency. Symptoms of an affected cat can be gastrointestinal or neurological in nature, and early signs of thiamine deficiencymay include decreased appetite, salivation, vomiting, and weight loss. In advanced cases, neurologic signs can develop, which may include ventriflexion (bending towards the floor) of the neck, wobbly walking, circling, falling, and seizures.

 

Consumers who purchased 3-pound bags of the recalled cat food are advised to stop feeding it to their cats and call Primal Pet Foods at 1-866-566-4652Monday through Friday, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm (PST). Those with cats which have consumed food from the recalled lot and which are displaying symptoms mentioned above are urged to contact their veterinarian. If treated promptly, thiamine deficiency is typically reversible. 

Advertisements

Nutrisca Chicken and Chick Pea Dry Dog Food Recall

image

 

Tuffy’s Pet Foods, a Minnesota-based pet food manufacturer, has announced a voluntary recall of limited lots of Nutrisca Chicken and Chick Pea Recipe Dry Dog Food due to potential contamination with Salmonella bacteria.
A routine sampling by the Ohio Department of Agriculture discovered the presence of Salmonella in one 4 lb. bag of the dog food. The manufacturer is issuing the recall action out of an abundance of caution, to safeguard customers, and is coordinating this voluntary recall with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The recalled products are specific to the 4 lb. bags of Nutrisca Chicken and Chick Pea Recipe Dry Dog Food. They can be identified by the first 5 digits of the affected Lot Codes, which can be found on the upper back of the bag, the Best By Dates on the upper back of the bag, and the UPC Code on the lower back of the bag. No other Nutrisca foods, treats, supplements, or other products are affected by this recall.

To determine whether your dog’s food is affected by this recall, look for this information on the package:

Nutrisca 4lb Chicken and Chick Pea Recipe Dry Dog Food

First five digits of Lot Codes: 4G29P, 4G31P, 4H01P, 4H04P, 4H05P, 4H06P

Best By Dates: Jul 28 16, Jul 30 16, Jul 31 16, Aug 03 16, Aug 04 16, Aug 05 16

UPC# 8 84244 12495 7

At the time of this article, no illnesses in animals or humans in relation to this product have been reported.

If you or your pet had contact with the recalled product, you are advised to watch for symptoms that may develop. Common symptoms associated with Salmonella poisoning include fever, lethargy, lack of appetite, diarrhea, bloody diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, or abdominal pain. In some rare cases, Salmonella poisoning can result in more severe symptoms. Pets may also be infected without symptoms and may pass the infection to other pets or humans in the hosuehold. If you, your pet, or a family member is experiencing these symptoms, or if you suspect infection, you are urged to contact an appropriate medical professional.

Consumers who purchased the 4 lb. bags of the recalled dry dog food product should stop using it immediately and discard it in a secure trash container or return it to the place of purchase.

Those who wish to contact Nutrisca for information or to ask questions may do so at their toll free number, 1-888-559-8833.

Is My Dog Truly A Carnivorous Mammal?

I’ve been blogging a lot about dogs and eating habits. My three Shih tzus are truly the most challenging pets I’ve ever had when it comes to their diet.  I usually keep up to date about the brands of foods , prescription foods and homemade foods that are healthy for pets. If any of my pets died because of something I may have neglected, it would be a guilt I would never get over. I’ve always known some of my purposes in life belong to caring for animals. I want to always make sure I go above and beyond.

I cook for my dogs to give them variety of what they are eating.   I mean who wants to eat a hamburger everyday? Scratch that! Some people may love it. My dogs , however , like spice and variety in their life. I read and research a lot on the debate of whether dogs are true carnivores or not. I want to share the information I’ve learned to help you make better informed decisions about your dog’s diet.

2015/01/img_0626.jpg

Carnivore, herbivore or omnivore? Well, since you’re this post, I assume you’re a human, therefore ,an omnivore. Now, you may prefer a rack of ribs over lets says just plain broccoli, but that doesn’t mean you’re only a carnivore. We human beings are omnivores and are well equipped to eat a wide variety of foods. But what about our dogs? Are they carnivores or omnivores? We already know they’re not herbivores, as there’s not a dog in existence who would turn down a nice piece of meat and only eat vegetables all the time. But there’s been a huge debate as to whether our dogs are true carnivores or omnivores. Let’s take a look at some of the facts to help us make the distinction.

In this post, we sourced some useful information from Dog Food Advisor that provides you with the answer to the question “are dogs true carnivores?”

Are Dogs True Carnivores?

From DNA studies, we know dogs evolved directly from the timber wolf somewhere around 15,000 years ago. And, of course, it should come as no surprise. Wolves are clearly carnivores.
So, by their very genetic pedigree, dogs also demonstrate similar and noticeable carnivorous traits. Their teeth, their digestive systems and their behavior clearly confirm this fact. Yet dogs must also be recognized for their significant omnivorous ability. Their proven ability to digest carbohydrate-based foods has been known for many years.
After all, modern genetic research has proof that ten canine genes play key roles in starch digestion and fat metabolism. However, a dog still shows unmistakable evidence that its body is optimized for eating meat.

Dogs Don’t Grind — They Chop

For comparison, think about a typical herbivore. A dairy cow. Now, picture the way they “chew their cud”. Cows chew widely from side-to-side. And they have broad, flat back teeth. And flat teeth are ideal for grinding grains and plant material into finer particles.

True omnivores (like humans) share this same combination of boxy back teeth and sideways grinding motion common to herbivores. Think of your own mouth and how you chew.

Dogs, on the other hand, don’t have flat teeth. Like all carnivores, they have narrow pointy back teeth. Plus dogs can’t chew from side-to-side. Their jaws can only move in an up-and-down, chop-chop motion. It’s the perfect combination for cutting meat into smaller chunks.

No Salivary Amylase

Herbivores and omnivores have one powerful digestive weapon carnivores typically lack. Carnivores do not produce amylase in their salivary glands. Amylase is a specialized enzyme most herbivores and omnivores produce in their saliva. It helps begin the breakdown of starchy carbohydrates into simple sugars — before they enter the stomach.

Although dogs do produce amylase. the enzyme is added further down the digestive tract — in the small intestine. So, without salivary amylase, a dog’s carbohydrate digestion can be decidedly more difficult.

Digestive Anatomy Reveals the Truth

Since they consume fewer but larger meals, carnivores have bigger stomachs than their grazing, plant-eating counterparts. What’s more, meat-eating animals exhibit a higher concentration of stomach acid. This allows faster digestion of animal protein. And the stronger acid kills the disease-causing bacteria abundant in decaying meat.
What’s more, herbivores have an unusually long gastrointestinal tract — exceeding ten times the animal’s body length. Longer systems like this are needed for consuming a plant-based diet.

Today’s Confusing Dog Food Marketplace

Yet in spite of this natural carnivorous design, dogs have still managed to evolve over thousands of years — even surviving on the meat and non-meat scraps and leftovers of human existence. So, over time, dogs have proven to be fully capable of thriving on a variety of foods.  Are you confused? Let’s say 80% carnivore and 20% omnivore.

Today, the dog food marketplace has become a living, breathing witness to the animal’s adaptive ability — and is abounding with an astonishing array of product designs. Some favor meat. Some feature vegetables. And others are made almost entirely of cereal grains and beans.
Source: Dog Food Advisor

While experts are still weighing in on either side of the debate, I think we can all safely say that our dogs are either carnivores with omnivore capabilities or omnivores with strong carnivore leanings. Regardless of how you cut it, it’s a sure thing that our dogs have the telltale signs of being carnivores, but have some physical features that allow them to eat an omnivore-like diet.  Are you confused? Let’s say, 80% carnivore and 20% omnivore.

When we feed our shih tzus , we feed a mix of meat with cooked veggies. What should you feed your diet challenging pet? I suggest that you stick to the basics when it comes to feeding your dog. More than 80 percent of what your dog eats should be meat-based. Enough meat in your dog’s diet will ensure that he/she is getting plenty of protein and enough of the essential fatty acids. Are you questioning if your dog can eat some vegetables ? Of course they can! They can eat it along with fruit. If you have picky eaters in your bunch, I’m sure by now you know they won’t be inclined to consistently eat the veggies and fruits. Carnivore or Omnivore, be sure to research the safest foods, and consider what the right balance of nutrients are needed to ensure a great diet that lends itself to a great quality of life.

til Next Time….

Recipe For Diabetic Dog Treats

20140114-194254.jpg

Original recipe makes 2 pounds
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
2 eggs
1 1/2 pounds beef liver, cut into pieces

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Line a 10×15 inch jellyroll pan with parchment paper.
Place the liver into a food processor. Pulse until finely chopped. If you have room, add the flour and eggs, and process until smooth. Otherwise, transfer to a bowl, and stir in the flour and eggs using a wooden spoon. Spread evenly in the prepared pan.
Bake for 15 minutes in the preheated oven, or until the center is firm. Cool, and cut into squares using a pizza cutter. The treats will have a consistency similar to a sponge. Store in a sealed container in the refrigerator.

Joey’s Jerky Brand Chicken Jerky Recalled Due To Salmonella Risk

20130911-052901.jpg

 

The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) is announcing a voluntary recall of Joey’s Jerky brand Chicken Jerky due to possible Salmonella risk.

Joey’s Jerky brand Chicken Jerky
Image/NH DHHS

Joey’s Jerky is produced in New Hampshire and the manufacturer, Kritter’s Kitchen Kreations, LLC, has voluntarily recalled all of the product. Joey’s Jerky was sold at the following six stores: America’s Pet in Hudson, Blue Seal in Bow, K9 Kaos in Dover, Osborne’s Agway in Concord, Sandy’s Pet Food Center in Concord, and The Yellow Dogs Barn in Barrington.

Health officials say at least 21 people in Merrimack and Hillsborough Counties have been identified with the same strain of the illness, but no deaths have occurred.

Through investigation and interviewing the ill people, the DHHS Bureau of Infectious Disease Control determined that the jerky treats were implicated in spreading Salmonella. Confirmation through laboratory testing of the jerky is pending at the New Hampshire Public Health Labs.

“While uncommon, pet food and treats can sometimes be contaminated with Salmonella, which is why it is so important for pet owners to wash their hands after handling pet food and treats,” said Dr. José Montero, Director of Public Health at DHHS. “I want to commend the manufacturer of Joey’s Jerky for their cooperation in this investigation and the epidemiologists here at Public Health for their excellent work. Salmonella can be a serious illness and the sooner the source of an outbreak is identified the sooner it can be stopped.”

Salmonella is a pathogen to both humans and animals. There is a risk for humans handling the contaminated dog food if poor hand washing techniques are not performed or surfaces in contact with the dog food are not properly cleaned.

In humans, Salmonella can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain.

In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

Pets, including dogs, with Salmonella can become lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. The clinical features of canine salmonellosis vary on strain, amount ingested and dog host factors.

Many dogs however are asymptomatic carriers of the bacteria and may shed Salmonella for up to 100 days after being infected. This can become a risk for family members and anyone with confirmed salmonellosis without a known risk of exposure, the family pet should be tested regardless of symptoms.

 

 

Flint River Ranch Statement on Continued Pet Food Recalls

20130621-171648.jpg

Hello FRR Family!

This coming October marks Flint River Ranch’s 19th anniversary! In those years, Flint River Ranch has helped set the industry’s standard for Super Premium pet foods; all-natural formulas made with human-quality ingredients without the addition of potentially harmful preservatives. Our use of superior ingredients, along with important quality controls and a dedicated oven-baking manufacturing process, produce simple, healthy, all-natural holistic canine and feline foods you trust.

While competition in our industry has increased, Flint River Ranch’s commitment to quality has never wavered. While some heavily-marketed brands lack solid nutrition, many manufacturers have followed the natural trend and tried to improve their offerings. Since it’s expensive to manufacture an all-natural, quality pet food, some regrettably took short-cuts. These short-cuts; like using cheaper imported ingredients, or short cutting safe production methods, proved harmful to pets and resulted in major pet food recalls that unfortunately continue to happen again & again. The stress, anger and even heartache by the past industry recalls is understandable and now with a third recall by the Natura™ company within 12 months, has caused damage to the entire industry and forced some customers to question what they are feeding their beloved pets.

Flint River Ranch continues to use high-quality, tested & safe ingredients. We have never been subject to or involved in a pet food recall nor had a negative regulatory review. We have never used ingredients from China, even before Chinese-sourced ingredients came under scrutiny. We will always think of the end result of our products; your pets, first!

Flint River Ranch follows the general concept of “Occam ‘s Razor“; of the simplest is often the correct solution and a product must not be multiplied beyond necessity. Flint River Ranch will always support the general philosophy of keeping our products simple.

We have truly appreciated your support during the past 19 years and look forward to the next 19 and beyond. Our sincere thanks from the entire Flint River Ranch Team to our loyal customers and hardworking distributors! It is enriching to be involved in your lives, and we take our responsibility of your pets health very seriously.

Thank you for your continued support of Flint River Ranch!

Jay P. Margedant, President
Flint River Ranch
www.frrco.com /123513

 

Bravo! Raw Frozen Dog Food Recall

20130403-201436.jpg

April 3, 2013 — Bravo! of Manchester, Connecticut has announced it is voluntarily recalling three of its raw diet frozen foods for dogs and cats because they could potentially be contaminated with Salmonella bacteria.
According to the company…
“…while these products tested negative for pathogens by an independent third party prior to distribution, they were run on the same day or an adjacent day to a product that tested positive for pathogens.
“The product that tested positive has been 100 percent contained and is not subject to this recall.”

What’s Being Recalled?

Item #21-405 – 5 lb chub (tube) of Bravo! Chicken Balance frozen raw diet with a “best used by” date of 3-6-15 or 3-12-15 printed on the plastic casing of the package

Item #21-102 – 2 lb. chub (tube) of Bravo! Chicken Blend frozen raw diet with a “best used by” date of 3-21-15 printed on the plastic casing of the package

Item #51-508 – 5 lb. bag of Bravo! Beef Blend Burgers with a “best used by” date of 3-21-15 or 3-22-15 printed on the back panel of the plastic bag

No other products are affected.

About Salmonella

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products. There’s also risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products — especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever.

Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arte rial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms.

Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting.

Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans.

If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

What to Do

For more information, consumers should visit the Bravo website or call 866-922-9222 Monday through Friday 9:00 am to 5:00 pm ET.

You can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.
Or go to Pet Food Complaints.

EVO, Innova, California Natural and HealthWise Dog Food Recall

20130318-214931.jpg

March 18, 2013 – Natura Pet Products has announced it is recalling four of its most popular brands of dry dog, cat and ferret foods due to possible contamination with Salmonella bacteria.
Brands being recalled include:

EVO
Innova
California Natural
HealthWise
No Karma, Mother Nature, wet or treat products are included in this recall.
No illnesses have been reported from the recalled products and no other P&G Pet Care brands are involved.
What’s Being Recalled?
Please visit this table of recalled products for complete details.
What to Do?
You can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.
Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

Get Critical Dog Food Recall Alerts
Delivered to You by Email

Get dog food recall alerts delivered right to your Inbox the moment we become aware of them. Subscribe to Happy Walk Happy Dog Blog email notification list now.