Tag Archives: dogs health

Reasons Rawhide is Dangerous For Your Dog To Chew

First, I must say I did not write this.  This is a blog written by  Rodney Habib. Here is his blog address:  www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com. This blog caught my attention because I have been guilty of giving rawhide, flat or bone shaped, to my dogs. This blog presents excellent information on why we, pet owners, need to stop feeding this to our dogs. There are also excellent advice from , Dr. Becker and Dogington Post. PLEASE ENJOY!

  
How can one of the most popular chew sticks on the planet be so dangerous for your pets, you ask?
I mean, most dogs chew on rawhide for hours on end, and not only does it keep them busy, but they seem to last forever.
Well if you understood what it took to make this toxic “raw” leather stick, you would quickly understand what the problem is.
Aside from the horror stories circulating all over social media these days, of pets needing emergency surgery after consuming rawhide, the majority of pet parents today, especially the newbies, believe that this chew is some sort of dried up meat stick.

Let me debunk that myth right away!



A rawhide stick is not the by-product of the beef industry nor is it made of dehydrated meat. Rather, rawhide is the by-product of the “Leather Industry”, so theoretically it is a leather chew.

Sounds awesome, right?
  
How It’s Made

“Producing rawhide begins with the splitting of an animal hide, usually from cattle. The top grain is generally tanned and made into leather products, while the inner portion, in its “raw” state, goes to the dogs.” TheBark.com
So, how does this leather, which is conveniently rolled up into pretty shapes, actually get made into those rawhide chews?
Follow along my friends and I will enlighten you on how this hide travels through a leathery process where it transforms from hide to a not-so beautiful, colorful, chew stick. Here is a paraphrased tutorial that was explained by the whole dog journal several years back:

STEP 1: To The Tannery

Normally, cattle hides are shipped from slaughterhouses to tanneries for processing. These hides are then treated with a chemical bath to help “preserve” the product during transport to help prevent spoilage.
(No one wants to purchase a black, spoiled rawhide stick!)
Once at the tannery: the hides are soaked and treated with either an ash-lye solution or a highly toxic recipe of sodium sulphide liming. This process will help strip the hair and fat that maybe attached to the hides themselves.

No, no one wants to see a hairy hide…)
Next on this glorious journey, these hides are then treated with chemicals that help “puff” the hide, making it easier to split into layers.
The outer layer of the hide is used for goods like car seats, clothing, shoes, purses, etc. But, it’s the inner layer that is needed to make the rawhide. (Oh and other things like gelatin, cosmetics, and glue as well!)

STEP 2: Cleansed In Chemicals

Now that we have the inner layer of the hide, it’s time to go to the post-tannery stage! Hides are washed and whitened using a solution of hydrogen peroxide and/or bleach; this will also help remove the smell of the rotten or putrid leather.
Bonus!
(Research also shows that other chemicals maybe used here to help the whitening process if the bleach isn’t strong enough.)

STEP 3: Make It Look Pretty

Now it’s time to make these whitened sheets of this “leathery by-product” look delicious! So, here is where the artistic painting process comes in.
“Basted, smoked, and decoratively tinted products might be any color (or odor) underneath the coating of (often artificial) dyes and flavors. They can even be painted with a coating of titanium oxide to make them appear white and pretty on the pet store shelves.” – whole-dog-journal.com
“…the Material Safety Data Sheet reveals a toxic confection containing the carcinogen FD&C Red 40, along with preservatives like sodium benzoate. But tracking the effects of chemical exposure is nearly impossible when it’s a matter of slow, low-dose poisoning.”– thebark.com
Ok, now that these hides have been painted, it’s time for the final process.


STEP 4: Getting It To Last Forever!

When tested: Lead, Arsenic, Mercury, Chromium salts, Formaldehyde and other toxic chemicals have been detected in raw hides.

So it’s safe to say that any sort of glues can be used as well!
Finally, it’s time to package and attach all the glorious marketing labels to the product.
Check out the fine print warning that’s attached with some of these rawhides:

[box type=”alert”]“Choking or blockages. If your dog swallows large pieces of rawhide, the rawhide can get stuck in the esophagus or other parts of the digestive tract. Sometimes, abdominal surgery is needed to remove them from the stomach or intestines. If it isn’t resolved, a blockage can lead to death.”[/box]

(Oh, how lovely…)
And there it is! It’s now ready to be shipped to store shelves where it can be purchased for our loving animal companions.

How do proactive veterinarians feel about these chews?

    Here is world-renowned veterinarian Doctor Karen Becker’s take on the matter:

“The name ‘rawhide’ is technically incorrect. A more accurate name would be processed-hide, because the skin isn’t raw at all. But the term “rawhide” has stuck.
Rawhide chews start out hard, but as your dog works the chew it becomes softer, and eventually he can unknot the knots on each end and the chew takes on the consistency of a slimy piece of taffy or bubble gum. And by that time your dog cannot stop working it — it becomes almost addictive.
At this point, there’s no longer any dental benefit to the chew because it has turned soft and gooey, and, in fact, it has become a choking and intestinal obstruction hazard.”

Ready for the jaw dropper?

An investigation by Humane Society International stated in their report, “In a particularly grisly twist, the skins of brutally slaughtered dogs in Thailand are mixed with other bits of skin to produce rawhide chew toys for pet dogs. Manufacturers told investigators that these chew toys are regularly exported to and sold in U.S. stores.” – dogingtonpost.com

Graphics For Emergency Veterinary Advice

This is a terrific graphic of advice , to help pet owners act proactively in case your dog or cat falls sick and get injured.    I printed this out and attached it  to  the bulletin board in my office.  I hope you make use of this info!
  

Lupus In Pets

  Listless Dog with Lupus


I, myself, was diagnosed with Lupus at 8 years old and have lived with for over 30 years.  May is a Special Month for me.  May is the month for Lupus Awareness .  It’s also National Pet Month. I thought to bring awareness to both is quite important. I usually do a lot during this month including the Lupus Walk and Fundraisers.

Have you ever had a doctor or veterinarian tell you that your pet shares many of the illnesses that you have. I have had plenty of pets that have suffered the illnesses I have including Lupus.  Yes , Pets as well suffer from this syndrome. So I want to inform you on what it is , what to look for and treatments so that your pets have a great quality of life.

Lupus in dogs does exist. Lupus is a type of autoimmune disease that causes the body’s immune system to attack itself. There are two types of lupus found in dogs; Systemic Lupus and Discoid Lupus.
Systemic Lupus is a fairly rare and potentially fatal form of lupus. It causes inflammation of the skin and can also cause damage to the heart, lungs, and joints. Because this disease affects many body systems it is difficult to diagnose. The most common symptoms are pain in muscles, skin sores, hair loss, increased urination and fever. This type of lupus can be managed with proper medication but not cured. Dr. Mike Richards says treatment usually involves the use of immunosuppressive medication, and that dogs can live with this disease successfully. Middle-aged female dogs are more prone to systemic lupus and it’s most common in breeds such as Beagles, German Shepherds, Collies, and Poodles.

Discoid Lupus is the second most common autoimmune disease in dogs and causes them to become allergic to there own tissue. Unlike Systemic Lupus, which affects the whole body, Discoid Lupus is found only on the skin, primarily the nose. This type of lupus is found on the skin, and most often on the nose. Symptoms include change in the appearance of the nose causing it to flake and peel. Due to the increase in sun exposure this disease is worse in the summer. This is diagnosed through examination of biopsy samples. Treatment involves using sunscreen, corticosteroids, and in severe cases, prednisone or other immunosuppressive medication can be taken. This type of lupus can occur at any age and is seen most often in Shelties, Siberian Huskies, and Collies.

According to Dr. Patricia Huff of Pet Samaritan Clinic, “Diagnosis of lupus is reached with a positive combination of clinical signs and laboratory diagnostic tests. SLE may have some signs in common with certain infectious diseases, neoplasms (new growths or tumors) and other conditions. “ Your veterinarian may order appropriate tests to rule out these other conditions. Radiographs (x-rays) of affected joints will allow differential diagnosis between lupus-associated joint disease and other forms of arthritis. A complete blood count (CBC) will reveal anemia and other blood cell disorders. A blood chemistry panel and urinalysis may demonstrate nonspecific changes consistent with SLE.

Lupus can be a difficult disease to diagnose. If suspect your dog has it, then consult with your vet.

For more information, visit: lupus.org.