Tag Archives: Dog

Everyday Items That Are Hazardous to Our Pets’ Health

It can happen to even the best pet owners. You turn around for one second and the dog is into the chocolate that was sitting on the counter, or the cat has discovered the Easter lily you thought was safely out of the way.

“We just don’t realize how determined our pets are to eat the things they shouldn’t,” Dr. Tina Wismer, DVM, medical director for the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, says.

Of the more than 180,000 cases that the organization handled in 2013, most of them involved pets who’d ingested human prescriptions. “Many children with ADHD don’t want to take their medications, so they leave pills on their plates, where pets can get at them,” Dr. Wismer says. “Even nonprescription medications, such as ibuprofen, can be a problem, because many brands have a sweet coating, so it’s like candy for dogs.”

As part of National Poison Prevention Week (March 15-21), Vetstreet has compiled an A-to-Z photo gallery of common pet poisons that should be on your radar. This list is not all inclusive, so for more information on these and many other toxins, check out the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center website and talk with your vet.
Acetaminophen
Acetaminophen, which is found in Tylenol and other medications, can cause liver damage in dogs. Cats are even more sensitive: Ingestion of a single 325 mg tablet by a 10-pound cat can cause red blood cell damage and even be fatal.
Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe.

Batteries
Batteries can be toxic to both dogs and cats, leading to ulcers in the mouth, esophagus and stomach.
Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe.

Chocolate
Chocolate can cause seizures and death in dogs and cats. Darker chocolate, such as unsweetened baker’s chocolate, is more toxic than milk or white chocolate. Even cocoa bean mulch, when eaten in large quantities, can be a problem.
Toxicity Ranking: mild to severe

Detergents
Detergents and fabric softener sheets can cause ulcers in the mouth, esophagus and stomach in dogs and cats. The newer laundry pods, which contain concentrated detergent packaged under pressure, may pose a greater risk. When pets bite into the pod, the contents can be forcibly expelled, then inhaled or swallowed in large amounts.
Toxicity Ranking: mild to moderate.

Ethylene Glycol
Ethylene glycol is found in antifreeze, windshield de-icing agents and motor oils. Dogs and cats are attracted to its sweet taste, but as little as a teaspoon in cats or a tablespoon in dogs can cause kidney failure. Recently, antifreeze and engine coolant manufacturers have agreed to voluntarily add bittering agents to reduce the products’ appeal to pets and children.
Toxicity Ranking: severe to fatal.

Fertilizers
Fertilizers can contain poisonous amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, iron, zinc, herbicides and pesticides. Keep dogs and cats away from treated lawns until they are dry. Check the product packaging, though, since some products must be rinsed into the lawn before it is safe to walk on.
Toxicity Ranking: mild to moderate.

Grapes
Grapes, raisins and currants — even grape juice — in small amounts can cause kidney failure in dogs.
Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe.

Household Cleaners
Household cleaners, such as bleach, drain cleaners and toilet bowl cleaners, can cause gastrointestinal ulcers and other problems in dogs and cats.
Toxicity Ranking: varies.

Insecticides
Insecticides in flea and tick products can cause problems if not used according to labels. Insecticides that are meant for dogs can cause severe toxicity in cats, leading to signs such as vomiting, seizures and difficulty breathing. Products intended for treating the yard or house should not be used on pets.
Toxicity Ranking: mild to severe.

Jimson Weed
Jimson weed, also known as devil’s trumpet, can cause restlessness, drunken walking and respiratory failure in dogs and cats.
Toxicity Ranking: moderate.

Kerosene
Kerosene, gasoline and tiki torch fluids can cause drooling, drunken walking and difficulty breathing in dogs and cats. If these products contain antifreeze, they are even more problematic.
Toxicity Ranking: mild to severe (potentially life threatening).

Lilies
Lilies — Easter, day, tiger, Japanese and Asiatic varieties — can cause kidney failure in cats. Lilies of the valley can cause heart rhythm problems and death in dogs and cats.
Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe.

Mothballs
Mothballs, especially if they contain naphthalene, can be toxic to dogs and cats, resulting in vomiting, diarrhea, increased drinking and urination, and seizures.
Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe (potentially life threatening).

Medications
Nonprescription medications, such as ibuprofen, can lead to severe ulcers and anemia, as well as liver and kidney failure in pets.
Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe (potentially life threatening).

Onions
Onions, garlic, leeks and chives can be toxic in dogs and cats. When chewed or swallowed, these ingredients can cause anemia and gastrointestinal upset.
Toxicity Ranking: mild to moderate.

Prescription Medications
Prescription medications, such as antidepressants and ADHD and cardiac drugs, are commonly ingested by pets when pills are dropped on the floor or left on counters. Even a small dose can cause problems.                                            Toxicity Ranking: varies.

Queensland Nuts
Queensland nuts, also known as macadamia nuts, can cause lethargy, vomiting and difficulty walking in dogs.
Toxicity Ranking: mild to moderate.

Rodenticides
Rodenticides, such as mouse and rat poisons, can contain a number of different toxins, which have different effects on dogs and cats. Several common ingredients, like warfarin and coumarin, can cause blood-clotting problems and hemorrhaging.
Toxicity Ranking: mild to severe.

Sago Palms
Sago palms are one of a number of toxic plants for dogs and cats. Ingestion can lead to vomiting, diarrhea and seizures, as well as liver failure in dogs.
Toxicity Ranking: severe

Tobacco
Tobacco can be toxic to both dogs and cats. Ingestion of nicotine in the tobacco plant or in cigarettes or patches can lead to vomiting, tremors, collapse and death.
Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe.

Unbaked Bread Dough
Unbaked bread dough can expand in the stomach. If the stomach twists, cutting off the blood supply, emergency surgery is needed. The yeast in the dough can also produce alcohol, leading to seizures and respiratory failure.
Toxicity Ranking: mild to severe.
Veterinary Prescriptions
Veterinary prescriptions, such as arthritis medications, are often meat flavored, which can be enticing to dogs. Ingestion of large quantities can result in stomach ulcers, liver failure or kidney failure.
Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe.

Windshield Wiper Fluid
Windshield wiper fluid can contain methanol or ethylene glycol. Ingestion of methanol can cause low blood sugar and drunken walking in dogs and cats.
Toxicity Ranking: mild to moderate.

Xylitol
Xylitol is a sugar-free sweetener commonly found in chewing gum, breath mints and toothpaste. In dogs, it can lead to dangerous drops in blood sugar and liver failure.
Toxicity Ranking: mild to severe.

Yard Products
Yard products, including snail and slug bait, herbicides and fertilizers, are never good for pets. Signs will vary by the ingredient.
Toxicity Ranking: varies.

Zinc
Zinc toxicity can happen when dogs and cats eat metal or coins. Ingestion of pennies minted after 1982 can be more problematic. Zinc can cause anemia, as well as liver, kidney or heart failure.
Toxicity Ranking: moderate to severe.

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Does Your Dog Have A Dirty Little Secret?

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Over a year ago, I wrote a blog called, “Why Do Dogs Eat Poop”?!.
It’s a mystical phenomenon that many of us do not understand . This year is a follow up . I will give you solutions to help deter this gross habit that the fur baby we are in love with has. I decided to post this because I’ve had many clients, as of late as well as professional pet sitters asking me for solutions. I will share some of my homemade solutions as well as solutions from professionals in the pet care industry .

HOMEMADE DETERRENTS

The more common sense approach to deterring your dog from eating poop is to make it taste bad. Lets see what’s in our house that will help us with this solution .

1) Where as lemon juice and hot sauce are great health benefits to us( master cleanse diet) coating these ingredients in stool is a very bad taste.

2). How many of us love pumpkin pie, pumpkin cake or just fresh pumpkin? Mm Mmm delicious . Yet coating two tablespoons into feces, yuck yuck yuck to the palate.

3) For all you meat lovers , share that meat tenderizer in your dog’s food. By the time it comes out as excrement , it leaves a very bad taste to make your dog think twice.

FROM A VETERINARIAN‘S POINT OF VIEW

1) When a dog begins to eat poop, that’s a big red flag that they are are not getting the nutrients needed from their diet. Switch to a healthier diet for your pet’s sake. You can cook or buy quality food that is formulated for the dog’s age, breed and any medical issues. Check out our food by Flint River Ranch.

2) Coprophagia is also a sign he’s not eating enough. Increase the amount of nutritious food your dog is eating . Flint River Ranch had good quality that you can feed with out the worry of weight gain.

3) Take your fur baby to your veterinarian for an examination for underlying medical and health problems, parasites and other problems that may be compelling him to eat feces.

4) Stop the access to poop. There are many reasons we encourage pet owners to havedoggy bags or a pooper scooper while walking. It not only keeps our neighborhoods clean but it stops the access of feces.

5) Walk your dog more and give him better exercise regimen . During the walks you can train him and control his proximity to other feces on the ground. Don’t have the time for those walking routines and know it’s necessary? Call us, Happy Walk Happy Dog for daily mid-day walks and daily twice a day walks/run.

6) As soon as your dog starts approaching excrement, tell her ‘nah-ah-ahhh’ or ‘leave it!’, and distract her with praise supported with a treat, clicker click, playtime or other action or activity that is appealing to the dog. This will convey the idea that it is more rewarding to attend to you than to attend to poop. As soon as she turns her attention to her, praise her (‘Good dog!’) and reward her. A wise practice is to always carry appealing tidbit treats, a favorite toy, clicker – something you can always use to effectively gain your dog’s attention and reinforce desired behaviors. Once you get her attention, give her something positive to do. For example, tell her to ‘Sit’, reward her for listening, then proceed to an enjoyable activity such as playing or walking together. Distract her from undesired things like feces, and substitute a good, desired behavior such as sitting and attending to you. A dog who is interacting with her owner can’t be investigating poop at the same time.

7) If your baby is pooping in the house, it’s another reason to call Happy Walk Happy Dogto get them on a regular schedule and decrease the loneliness.

I hope these tips help all of you to deal with the issue of Coprophagia and resolve it.

Til Next Time….

10 Reasons Your Children Should Own Pets

 

 

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Decade after decade, the debate continues – is it good for children to grow up with pets? There are many positive reasons why children should own pets. Not only do pets teach children many life skills, they are also wonderful friends. Check out 10 reasons why your child should have a pet.

1. Responsibility

Children with pets develop a sense of responsibility and care for others early on in life. Pets need care and attention all the time. They depend on their humans to feed, entertain, and exercise them. Children who are active in raising their pets usually learn how to be empathetic and compassionate. Learning how to be responsible for another creature will allow the youngsters to better take care of themselves as well.

It is important for pet owners to help their children take care of the pets, gradually releasing responsibility to them over time. When they are young, children can help their parents fill the water or food bowls. As they get older, the assistance can gradually increase.

2. Self Confidence

Along with responsibility for a pet comes the building of self-confidence. When children are successful at raising their pets, they feel good about themselves. In turn, their self-esteem increases and they carry a confident air about them. They are, in a sense, proud of their accomplishments.

3. Less Prone to Allergy & Asthma

Multiple studies over the years have shown that children who grow up with pets are less prone to develop allergies and asthma. When exposed to pet dander and other allergens before the age of one, children tend to develop stronger immune systems. Results published inClinical and Experimental Allergy state that boys who grew up with indoor pets were half as likely to develop severe allergies later on in life

4. Exercise and Play

Pets, especially dogs, need exercise and play. The activities that children participate in with their pets are usually physical. This allows boys and girls to stay fit. In general, families spend more time outside when they have pets. The sunshine and fresh air are good for everyone. Learning about the need for exercise for pets to stay healthy helps children apply the same concepts to their own wellbeing.

5.Calm

Pets tend to bring about a sense of calm for children. Some youngsters are more relaxed around their pets than other humans. Like adults, children turn to their pets when they are feeling sad, angry, or otherwise upset. Magically, pets will bring peace to the situation and provide their humans with unconditional love.

6. Relieve Stress

Along the same lines of keeping children calm, dogs are also great to have around as stress relievers. Being around dogs can be extremely therapeutic for the entire family. Just cuddling with the family pooch can bring about a sense of safety and security for children, let alone the rest of the family. Often, people turn to their dogs for comfort. They make good sounding boards as they are good listeners and never talk back. They never try to give advice when it is not wanted. They are simply there as calming influences for people who are flustered and stressed out.

Although cats are not as compassionate, as pets, they can still help relieve undue stress. There is something to be said when cats cuddle up. Their soft coats and purring can help their owners feels a sense of calm. There are gentle sides to cats – they just don’t like to show it very often.

7. Improve Reading Skills

Many children are more comfortable reading aloud to pets than they are other humans. Perhaps it is because pets do not judge – pets do not correct the children and make them reread. The bottom line to improving reading skills is to practice it repeatedly. The more children read, the better they get at it. At younger ages, it is best for children to read aloud so that they can hear themselves.

When pets are used to help children read, they essentially support the improvement of fluency. The oral practice children experience when reading to their pets helps them become fluent readers, resulting in better comprehension of what they are reading.

8. Learn About Consequences

Caring for pets can teach children a great deal about consequences. When pets are not cared for properly, the results are real and easy for children to grasp. If fish are not fed, they die. If dogs don’t exercise, they get agitated. When cats are ignored, they will seek revenge and do something mean. If a gerbil or hamster’s cage does not get cleaned out, it will start to really smell bad.

9. Learn About Commitment

Growing up with a pet is a huge commitment on the part of the human. Pets are not things children can just put on shelves when they get tired of taking care of them. They need to be fed, cleaned, exercised, played with, and otherwise loved every single day. Having a pet is a total commitment and cannot ever be treated as a part-time job. This teaches children to commit and follow through with the task.

10. Discipline

When growing up with a pet, children learn a great deal about discipline. If they have a dog at home, they learn to train it and teach it how to listen. It’s been scientifically proven that having a dog helps children learn about discipline. Some would argue that cats discipline their owners naturally.

There are many sound reasons why children benefit from owning pets. There are many life skills they learn as a result of caring for another being and committing to the responsibility. As an added bonus, children would be able to share their youths with automatic best friends.

 

PETS and LAUNDRY PODs

Happy Holidays Everyone!

It’s been a great busy year and looking forward to 2015. I want to share an article from a trusted Veterinarian.

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Why Laundry Detergent, Pods Are Dangerous to Pets
Dr. Tina Wismer

Laundry detergent pods (single-use laundry packs) have been in the news recently for causing poisonings in children who, attracted by the bright, candylike packaging, ingest them. These pods have surged in popularity recently because they are so easy to use — you just grab a pack that’s about the size of a mini candy bar and pop it in the wash. But if they are a danger for children, what about pets who may eat them?

Though pods can seem like potential food items or toys to pets, it’s important to keep in mind that detergents in any kind of packaging are of concern. Laundry detergents contain chemicals called ionic and anionic surfactants. Although small ingestions of these substances, such as a lick of a small spill, generally cause only drooling and/or retching, larger ingestions are problematic (more on that in a minute).
Why Pods Are Dangerous
One of the reasons pods are dangerous is that the detergent in them is more concentrated than in bottled formulations (although pets generally seem to consume a smaller amount as compared to spills). Detergents also tend not to be handled or regarded with the same caution as other household toxins. Pods, like liquid detergents, are frequently stored unsecured in laundry rooms. Due to their handy packaging, they are also sometimes tossed on top of waiting loads of wash. They are also easy to lose track of if they fall off a counter and slide under an appliance or furniture, where curious pets can later fish them out for play, which may include mouthing the pod. Since the pods are meant to dissolve in water, saliva can lead to a release of the contents even if the pet hasn’t actually bitten through the packaging. Dry pods do not pop easily just by squeezing, but once a pod is wet by water or saliva, the contents can readily ooze out.
What the ASPCA Poison Control Hotline Is Seeing
When comparing single-use products to liquid detergent, there is one obvious difference we have noticed here at ASPCA Animal Poison Control. Though the overall number of calls we receive regarding detergent poisonings has remained the same since these products debuted on the market, there are some interesting differences by species.

For instance, dogs are much more likely to ingest single-use packs than cats. Dogs make up about 92 percent of single-use pack cases; they are involved in just under 60 percent of liquid detergent cases. Cats make up 6.5 percent of single-use pack cases and 41 percent of liquid detergent cases. Cats are more likely to knock over open bottles of liquid detergent and get the product all over themselves, ingesting the detergent through grooming.
Detergent Can Be Deadly
As stated earlier, a lick or two isn’t likely to cause a big problem, but larger ingestions of laundry detergent can cause severe clinical signs. It doesn’t matter for pets if detergent is in liquid form or the concentrated pod form that is now in the news. The most commonly seen clinical sign with detergent ingestion is vomiting. One problem with detergent is that it is foamy; when the animal vomits, the foam can be inhaled into the lungs. In the worst cases, the soap coats the airways and hinders oxygen exchange in the lungs, causing animals to suffocate. More commonly it can cause coughing, difficulty breathing and inflammation of the lung tissues. Gagging and retching are also common, due to irritation in the back of the throat.
What to Do if a Pet Ingests Detergent
If an animal does ingest laundry detergent in either pod or liquid form, contact your veterinarian or a poison control hotline immediately. If the ingestion is determined to be minor and there is no vomiting, your veterinarian will likely dose your pet with small amounts of water or milk to dilute the substance. If there is detergent on the hair coat, rinse it off completely with water. Any animal with repetitive vomiting or difficulty breathing should see a veterinarian immediately.

Whether in pod form or liquid, detergents are a sometimes under-recognized household toxin. Remember to keep all laundry products away from pets. Make sure bottle tops are on tight, that the products are stored out of reach of pets, and that pets cannot knock over any containers. One silver lining to the appearance of laundry pods on the market is that they seem to be raising awareness overall among owners about the toxicity of everyday detergents to pets and the need to keep these products secured.

He Dropped His Dog Off At The Sitter. What Happened Next Is Every Pet Owner’s Worst Nightmare

I always like to inform Pet Parents the importance of finding a Professional Pet Sitter to take care of your dog while you are away.
I recently read two articles where Pet Parents either utilized a teenager to care for their pet or Rover where people advertise just as a hobby and no insurance for both. Neither of these caretakers” had true experience in caring for animals. Loving Animals , while is great, is not a qualification for caring for animals. This story I have here comes from viralnova.com. Read to find out what happened to this Pet Parents beloved pet.

Before going away on a holiday at Christmas, this family decided to board their 3 year-old Shar Pei Akayla. Akayla’s dad used Rover.com to find a family to watch her. The website claims to be a mediator that will put you in contact with safe homes to care for your dog while you are away. “No more lonely cages, just happy homes full of love!”

The couple found a dog sitter with positive reviews. She was advertising herself as looking to start a professional dog-boarding business. On December 24th, Akayla was dropped off at the woman’s home.

Putting the well-being of a loved one in the hands of another person is always frightening, but to know that something went terribly wrong for Akayla would have been terrifying for this family. Thank goodness she survived the vicious mauling and was able to recover.

Source: imgur.com

If you ever use a dog sitter, do your research. Websites like Rover.com may have reviews, but you’re giving away precious cargo. Be careful! Please share this article with others so they can be cautioned.

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The Dirty Dozen: 12 Pet Treats to Avoid

By: Brandy Arnold of The Dogington Post

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If you were making your own dog treats, using the freshest and most wholesome, healthy ingredients, would you ever consider dumping sugar into the mix?

Of course not. So why, then, do a number of the most popular dog treats on the market contain high amounts of sugar? Because dogs love it.

According to a press release from Dr. Ernie Ward, founder of the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP) and author of “Chow Hounds: Why Our Dogs Are Getting Fatter – A Vet’s Plan to Save Their Lives” (2010 HCI),

…the problem is linked to money – lots of it. With US pet treat sales estimated to be nearly $2 billion in 2010, the treat bowl has turned golden. “Sugar is incredibly attractive to dogs. If a dog gobbles a treat quickly, an owner is more likely to give another – and another. This adds up to more sales – and profits. In the race for pet treat profits, our pets’ health is being bankrupted.”

With 45% of American dogs and 58% of cats considered overweight, an estimated 89 million pets are at high risk for developing conditions such as arthritis, diabetes, high blood pressure and more.

In addition to obesity, sugary treats lead to behavioral problems as well.

“Numerous studies in rats demonstrate that overfeeding sugar can create symptoms similar to drug addiction. A dog’s daily sweet treat may be contributing to overeating and other undesirable behaviors. This is why I call today’s high-sugar treats ‘kibble crack.’”

Still, pet treat manufacturers blame pet owners. They are, after all, the ones that purchase and feed the sugary treats.

So, Dr. Ward listed what he calls “The Dirty Dozen,” the 12 most popular sugary dog treats that should be avoided. Pet parents should be aware of what they’re feeding their pets, understand ingredient labels, and to avoid treats that masquerade as healthy and nutritious while silently contributing to the obesity epidemic.

His goal is to help pet parents to be more aware of what they’re feeding their pets. “Pet owners definitely have a feeding disorder when it comes to their pets. Ultimately it’s up to each owner to control how much they feed their pets. What I want to bring attention to is what ingredients are in pet treats – and why. Pet owners must begin to question why there is sugar in a treat that claims to help teeth,” he said.

Dr. Ward’s Dirty Dozen – Popular Sugary Pet Treats

Pet Treat Added Sugar
Canine CarryOuts Chew-lotta Dextrose first ingredient
Snausages SnawSomes! Beef and Chicken Flavor Sugars 3 of first 4 ingredients
Pedigree Jumbone Mini Snack Food for Small Dogs Sugars 2 of 3 first ingredient
Petrodex Dental Treats for Cats Dextrose second ingredient
Pedigree Jumbone Sugar third ingredient
Milk Bone Essentials Plus Oral Care Sugar third ingredient
Pup-Peroni Lean Beef Recipe Sugar third ingredient
Science Diet Simple Essentials Treats Training Adult Treats with Real Beef Sugar third ingredient
Cesar Softies Dog Treats Sugar third ingredient
Milk-Bone Chewy Chicken Drumsticks Sugar third ingredient
Meow Mix Moist Cat Treats Corn syrup fourth ingredient
Pedigree Marrobone Sugar third ingredient
Other common sugar-containing treats according to Dr. Ernie Ward:

Pedigree Jumbone – Sugar third ingredient
Beneful Snackin’ Slices – Sugar fourth ingredient
Pit’r Pat Fresh Breath Mint Flavored Cat Treats – Maltodextrin first ingredient
Three Dog Bakery Lick ‘n Crunch – Dextrose third ingredient
Beneful Snackin Slices – Sugar fourth ingredient
Busy Chewnola – Maltodextrin second ingredient
Exclusively Dog Vanilla Flavor Sandwich Creme Dog Cookies – Sugars first two ingredients
Canine Carryouts Dog Treats – Corn syrup second ingredient
For more information, visit http://www.PetObesityPrevention.com or http://www.DrErnieWard.com .

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5 Poisonous Plants That Can Ruin Your Dog’s Holiday Season

By Liz Acosta – Dogster

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Holiday plants can bring festive color to your home … and they can bring sickness to your dog. Check out our infographic and make sure to spread the word.

Some of the plants we bring into our homes for the holidays can be deadly if consumed. And we know you’re not planning on eating them, but you can’t really tell your dog friend, “Hey, dog friend, don’t eat that poinsettia unless you want to be really sick,” because we still haven’t figured out how to communicate directly with our canine companions. (Bummer, I know.)

We’ve put together a handy infographic of plants to avoid and listed why they’re potentially deadly.

  1. Poinsettia: This red-leafed plant doesn’t actually live up to all the hype — it’s actually only mildly toxic. However, even mild toxicity can be fatal when combined with other conditions. Better safe than sorry.
  2. Mistletoe: While the mistletoe may be a symbol of merry-making, it’s toxic if swallowed — but not as toxic as once believed. Again — better safe than sorry!
  3. Holly: Holly berries may be the most attractive to dogs, but the leaves, bark, and seeds are just as poisonous. The effect of holly on dogs is similar to that of caffeine and chocolate.
  4. Amaryllis: Less common than the other plants on this list, amaryllis causes abdominal pain and convulsions, so keep an eye out for it!
  5. Pine needles: Probably the least of your concerns here, pine needles may cause harm if swallowed, puncturing intestines or stomach lining. The tree oils might irritate mucous membranes, but just keeping your tree area tidy should prevent any problems.

Signs of poisoning may be:

If you suspect your dog may have been poisoned, please seek immediate medical attention.

Happiest holidays! Here’s wishing you and your loved ones a bright and warm celebration!

Fear Issues In Dogs

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There have been a lot of questions lately addressed to me about fear issues in pets. So I want to address the issue about fear/aggression issues in this blog. I am a member of the Pet Professional Guild and one of the issues we talk about are fear issues with animals. Here is a great write up by one of our members who is a professional dog trainer. Her name is Leah Roberts.

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Aggression always (or at least 99.9% of the time) is a fear issue. Just like when we feel threatened we have the choice between fight, flight, and freeze, so do dogs make a similar choice. They may hide behind something and shake, lunge and attack, or just freeze on the spot. In all cases, you want to address the underlying fear, not the behavior. Once you have healed the fear, the behavior will change on its own.

There are two methods of dealing with fear that work beautifully. Both are ways of associating good things with the trigger (object of fear) and replacing that with the perception that the trigger is threatening.

Open Bar/Closed Bar: As long as the trigger is in sight, chicken (or a very special yummy treat) is being shoveled into the dog’s mouth. I also like to “cheerlead” – praise in a happy tone of voice. When the trigger moves out of sight, the chicken and cheering stop.

Click the Trigger: Watch the dog’s eyes. As soon as the dog looks at the trigger, click (or use a verbal marker) and immediately hold the chicken to the side of the dog’s nose, so that his eye contact is immediately broken to take the treat. Repeat. Repeat.

In both cases, it is ultimately important to start at a distance/level of intensity where your dog notices the trigger, but is not bothered by it. If he’s already reacting, you are too close. In both cases, you are working toward getting a “yay, there’s the trigger” reaction. Not just tolerance, but happy excitement. Once you get that, you move a teensy bit closer and start again.

If even once during the therapy your dog is placed “over threshold” – where he feels threatened – you have lost your progress. So you may have to change your routine. If you normally walk your dog where there are other dogs who appear too close for comfort, walk elsewhere for a while until your dog is fine with that level of intensity. If you have your dog out in the house when visitors come and he’s upset, put him away before you have visitors in until he is happy to see them.

Best case scenario, locate a force-free trainer who uses these scientific principles of counter-conditioning. Never “correct” a reaction, because you will associate “bad things happen when that trigger is around” and lose your progress. Note that if you get a reaction, YOU made the mistake, not the dog. You’re too close.

First place to look for a force-free trainer: http://petprofessionalguild.com/

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What Home Treatments Are Best for Diarrhea in Dogs & Reference Guide to Download…

Dog-diarrhea

One of the many new activities I have tried for my pets is cooking for them. It doesn’t mean I have eliminated feeding them holistic dog food but it brings more variety into their daily meals.  One of the side effects that can happen is your pooch can have a diarrhea from the transition. Of course I grew concerned because I needed to make sure my pets were still healthy and I was not feeding them anything that they should not be eating. I checked with our veterianarian and also look up information about pets having bouts of diarrhea and what I can do.  

My pets are fine now but of course it came up in conversations I have had with clients and other pet sitters . We discussed the best remedies and preventative care. So I decided to blog about this for any pet owners that have dealt with this like I have and need another confirmation that their treatment and care is correct when trying to cure diarrhea in their pets.

All dogs, at one point or another, have had a bout of diarrhea. Most diarrhea lasts a couple days, however when loose bowels continue over a long period of time it is a cause for concern; especially if the diarrhea gets severe, and is uncontrolled liquid squirts. My pets are my babies ( And for that matter, my clients’ pets , I treat them as my children too ).  If your baby has a soft stool in his/her diaper, it may not be a cause for you to seek your doctor’s advice, for instance, if you have tried a new food ( my cooking)  which upset the baby’s belly.  If this is the case for your pet, it may be fine for you to treat it at home. However, if your baby had uncontrolled diarrhea, you would seek a medical doctor’s advice, as there could be an underlying cause. Like a baby, a puppy or dog  can dehydrate FAST from severe diarrhea. REMEMBER, diarrhea can be mild or severe and the treatments differ.

Causes of Diarrhea

Bacteria/ Parasites – Viruses and parasites are one of the main causes of diarrhea in dogs If you are concerned that this is the cause, please get a stool  sample to the vet  to check for Coccidia(Coccidiosis), Giardia, Trichomonas or other infections. If your litter of two-week-old puppies gets diarrhea, it could be worms. Normally we do not worm pups till three weeks, but some do it at two weeks. When worms become active, it can cause diarrhea. If the diarrhea worsens, even after using a worming medicine, you may need to check for coccidia. The incubation period is 13 days, and the dams often carry it. They would come in contact from the dam at birth, or shortly after; they are not born with it.  If a 13-day-old puppy has diarrhea, it often means coccidia. This requires vet medicine to treat. It can be found in a stool sample.

Anxiety – My pets as with all pets get completely excited or stressed over many things. One issue can be the stress of traveling, being in a kennel or a doctor’s office.  Believe it or not dogs/puppies have been known to get diarrhea from the excitement/stress of these issues.

Foreign Diets –  Dogs are natural scavengers and tend to eat many indigestible substances, including garbage and decayed food, dead animals, grass, wild and ornamental plants, and pieces of plastic, wood, paper, and other foreign materials. Many of these are irritating to the stomach as well as to the bowel, and are partially eliminated through vomits.


 Food Intolerance
 – As I mentioned earlier, the change in diet can put a strain on your pet’s belly. Foods that some dogs seem unable to tolerate can include beef, pork, chicken, horsemeat, fish, eggs, dairy products, spices, corn, wheat, soy, gravies, salts, spices, fats, and some commercial dog foods. Note that food intolerance is not the same as food allergy, which causes dermatitis and possibly vomiting, but rarely causes diarrhea.

Drugs & Medications – Diarrhea is a common side effect of many drugs and medications, particularly the NSAIDs ,which include aspirin. Some heart medications, some dewormers, and most antiobiotics also can cause diarrhea.

Treatments of Diarrhea In Dogs

 Home Treatment For Acute Diarrhea

The most important step in treating acute diarrhea is to rest the GI tract by withholding all food for 24 hours. The dog should be encouraged to drink as much water as he wants. With persistent diarrhea, consider giving a supplemental electrolyte solution such as Pedialyte, available over the counter in pharmacies and grocery stores.  This has been a great solution for me and one of my main first options. Dilute it by one-half with water and add it to the dog’s drinking bowl. Custom canine electrolyte solutions and sport drinks are also available, such as K9 Thirst Quencher. These are flavored to encourage the dog to drink. If the dog won’t drink the electrolyte solution, offer only water. A low-salt bouillon cube dissolved in the water can help encourage him to drink.

Acute diarrhea usually responds within 24 hours to intestinal rest. Start the dog out on an easily digestible diet that’s low in fat. Examples are boiled hamburger (one part drained meat to two parts cooked rice) and boiled chicken with the skin removed. Cooked white rice, cottage cheese, cooked macaroni, cooked oatmeal, and soft-boiled eggs are other easily digestible foods. Feed three or four small meals a day for the first two days. Then slowly switch the diet back to the dog’s regular food.

Obtain immediate veterinary care if:

  • The diarrhea continues for more than 24 hours
  • The stool contains blood or is black and tarry
  • The diarrhea is accompanied by vomiting
  • The dog appears weak or depressed or has a fever

What if the Diarrhea is Chronic?

If it turns out that your dog  chronically has diarrhen then your  first step is to find and treat the underlying cause. Diarrhea resulting from a change in diet can be corrected by switching back to the old diet and then making step-by-step changes to pinpoint the cause. When lactase deficiency is suspected, eliminate milk and dairy products from the diet, particularly as they are not required for adult dogs.

Diarrhea caused by overeating (characterized by large, bulky, unformed stools) can be controlled by tailoring the diet more accurately to the caloric needs of the dog and feeding his daily ration in three equal meals.

Chronic, intermittent diarrhea that persists for more than three weeks requires veterinary attention.


If You are Interested in any routine care of your dog, Feel Free to Download this reference guide and print out.  routine-health-care-of-dogs10092013(3)

Do Dogs Whine When They’re Bored? by Chris Miksen, Demand Media

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I didn’t write this article. But I think it’s a great article to read and educate yourself. So Enjoy!!

Your pup whines and attempts to stop him lead only to more whining. Eventually he goes into full-blown crazy mode, moaning, spinning around and nosing you. There’s a good chance he’s just bored and wants to play, but that’s not always the case. Sometimes he wants something else, like food, or he’s crying because he’s a sick puppy.

To continue article, click this link.
http://dogcare.dailypuppy.com/dogs-whine-theyre-bored-2312.html