Tag Archives: Diarrhea

What Home Treatments Are Best for Diarrhea in Dogs & Reference Guide to Download…

Dog-diarrhea

One of the many new activities I have tried for my pets is cooking for them. It doesn’t mean I have eliminated feeding them holistic dog food but it brings more variety into their daily meals.  One of the side effects that can happen is your pooch can have a diarrhea from the transition. Of course I grew concerned because I needed to make sure my pets were still healthy and I was not feeding them anything that they should not be eating. I checked with our veterianarian and also look up information about pets having bouts of diarrhea and what I can do.  

My pets are fine now but of course it came up in conversations I have had with clients and other pet sitters . We discussed the best remedies and preventative care. So I decided to blog about this for any pet owners that have dealt with this like I have and need another confirmation that their treatment and care is correct when trying to cure diarrhea in their pets.

All dogs, at one point or another, have had a bout of diarrhea. Most diarrhea lasts a couple days, however when loose bowels continue over a long period of time it is a cause for concern; especially if the diarrhea gets severe, and is uncontrolled liquid squirts. My pets are my babies ( And for that matter, my clients’ pets , I treat them as my children too ).  If your baby has a soft stool in his/her diaper, it may not be a cause for you to seek your doctor’s advice, for instance, if you have tried a new food ( my cooking)  which upset the baby’s belly.  If this is the case for your pet, it may be fine for you to treat it at home. However, if your baby had uncontrolled diarrhea, you would seek a medical doctor’s advice, as there could be an underlying cause. Like a baby, a puppy or dog  can dehydrate FAST from severe diarrhea. REMEMBER, diarrhea can be mild or severe and the treatments differ.

Causes of Diarrhea

Bacteria/ Parasites – Viruses and parasites are one of the main causes of diarrhea in dogs If you are concerned that this is the cause, please get a stool  sample to the vet  to check for Coccidia(Coccidiosis), Giardia, Trichomonas or other infections. If your litter of two-week-old puppies gets diarrhea, it could be worms. Normally we do not worm pups till three weeks, but some do it at two weeks. When worms become active, it can cause diarrhea. If the diarrhea worsens, even after using a worming medicine, you may need to check for coccidia. The incubation period is 13 days, and the dams often carry it. They would come in contact from the dam at birth, or shortly after; they are not born with it.  If a 13-day-old puppy has diarrhea, it often means coccidia. This requires vet medicine to treat. It can be found in a stool sample.

Anxiety – My pets as with all pets get completely excited or stressed over many things. One issue can be the stress of traveling, being in a kennel or a doctor’s office.  Believe it or not dogs/puppies have been known to get diarrhea from the excitement/stress of these issues.

Foreign Diets –  Dogs are natural scavengers and tend to eat many indigestible substances, including garbage and decayed food, dead animals, grass, wild and ornamental plants, and pieces of plastic, wood, paper, and other foreign materials. Many of these are irritating to the stomach as well as to the bowel, and are partially eliminated through vomits.


 Food Intolerance
 – As I mentioned earlier, the change in diet can put a strain on your pet’s belly. Foods that some dogs seem unable to tolerate can include beef, pork, chicken, horsemeat, fish, eggs, dairy products, spices, corn, wheat, soy, gravies, salts, spices, fats, and some commercial dog foods. Note that food intolerance is not the same as food allergy, which causes dermatitis and possibly vomiting, but rarely causes diarrhea.

Drugs & Medications – Diarrhea is a common side effect of many drugs and medications, particularly the NSAIDs ,which include aspirin. Some heart medications, some dewormers, and most antiobiotics also can cause diarrhea.

Treatments of Diarrhea In Dogs

 Home Treatment For Acute Diarrhea

The most important step in treating acute diarrhea is to rest the GI tract by withholding all food for 24 hours. The dog should be encouraged to drink as much water as he wants. With persistent diarrhea, consider giving a supplemental electrolyte solution such as Pedialyte, available over the counter in pharmacies and grocery stores.  This has been a great solution for me and one of my main first options. Dilute it by one-half with water and add it to the dog’s drinking bowl. Custom canine electrolyte solutions and sport drinks are also available, such as K9 Thirst Quencher. These are flavored to encourage the dog to drink. If the dog won’t drink the electrolyte solution, offer only water. A low-salt bouillon cube dissolved in the water can help encourage him to drink.

Acute diarrhea usually responds within 24 hours to intestinal rest. Start the dog out on an easily digestible diet that’s low in fat. Examples are boiled hamburger (one part drained meat to two parts cooked rice) and boiled chicken with the skin removed. Cooked white rice, cottage cheese, cooked macaroni, cooked oatmeal, and soft-boiled eggs are other easily digestible foods. Feed three or four small meals a day for the first two days. Then slowly switch the diet back to the dog’s regular food.

Obtain immediate veterinary care if:

  • The diarrhea continues for more than 24 hours
  • The stool contains blood or is black and tarry
  • The diarrhea is accompanied by vomiting
  • The dog appears weak or depressed or has a fever

What if the Diarrhea is Chronic?

If it turns out that your dog  chronically has diarrhen then your  first step is to find and treat the underlying cause. Diarrhea resulting from a change in diet can be corrected by switching back to the old diet and then making step-by-step changes to pinpoint the cause. When lactase deficiency is suspected, eliminate milk and dairy products from the diet, particularly as they are not required for adult dogs.

Diarrhea caused by overeating (characterized by large, bulky, unformed stools) can be controlled by tailoring the diet more accurately to the caloric needs of the dog and feeding his daily ration in three equal meals.

Chronic, intermittent diarrhea that persists for more than three weeks requires veterinary attention.


If You are Interested in any routine care of your dog, Feel Free to Download this reference guide and print out.  routine-health-care-of-dogs10092013(3)

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Joey’s Jerky Brand Chicken Jerky Recalled Due To Salmonella Risk

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The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) is announcing a voluntary recall of Joey’s Jerky brand Chicken Jerky due to possible Salmonella risk.

Joey’s Jerky brand Chicken Jerky
Image/NH DHHS

Joey’s Jerky is produced in New Hampshire and the manufacturer, Kritter’s Kitchen Kreations, LLC, has voluntarily recalled all of the product. Joey’s Jerky was sold at the following six stores: America’s Pet in Hudson, Blue Seal in Bow, K9 Kaos in Dover, Osborne’s Agway in Concord, Sandy’s Pet Food Center in Concord, and The Yellow Dogs Barn in Barrington.

Health officials say at least 21 people in Merrimack and Hillsborough Counties have been identified with the same strain of the illness, but no deaths have occurred.

Through investigation and interviewing the ill people, the DHHS Bureau of Infectious Disease Control determined that the jerky treats were implicated in spreading Salmonella. Confirmation through laboratory testing of the jerky is pending at the New Hampshire Public Health Labs.

“While uncommon, pet food and treats can sometimes be contaminated with Salmonella, which is why it is so important for pet owners to wash their hands after handling pet food and treats,” said Dr. José Montero, Director of Public Health at DHHS. “I want to commend the manufacturer of Joey’s Jerky for their cooperation in this investigation and the epidemiologists here at Public Health for their excellent work. Salmonella can be a serious illness and the sooner the source of an outbreak is identified the sooner it can be stopped.”

Salmonella is a pathogen to both humans and animals. There is a risk for humans handling the contaminated dog food if poor hand washing techniques are not performed or surfaces in contact with the dog food are not properly cleaned.

In humans, Salmonella can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain.

In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e., infected aneurysms), endocarditis and arthritis.

Pets, including dogs, with Salmonella can become lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever and vomiting. The clinical features of canine salmonellosis vary on strain, amount ingested and dog host factors.

Many dogs however are asymptomatic carriers of the bacteria and may shed Salmonella for up to 100 days after being infected. This can become a risk for family members and anyone with confirmed salmonellosis without a known risk of exposure, the family pet should be tested regardless of symptoms.

 

 

Honest Kitchen Recalls Five Lots of Dog Food

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The Honest Kitchen has today announced it is voluntarily recalling five lots of its Verve, Zeal and Thrive dog foods because they may be contaminated with Salmonella bacteria.

The items were produced between August and November 2012 and sold nationwide in the US and Canada via retail stores, mail order and online after August 2012.
No other Honest Kitchen production dates, batches, or products are affected.
About Salmonella
Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms:
Nausea
Vomiting
Diarrhea or bloody diarrhea
Abdominal cramping
Fever
Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms.
Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.
Animals with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some animals will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain.
Infected but otherwise healthy animals can be carriers and infect other animals or humans.
If your animals have consumed the recalled product and display these symptoms, you are advised to contact your veterinarian.
About the Recall
The Company is taking this action after learning that one of its raw ingredients suppliers has recalled a batch of human‐grade parsley that may contain Salmonella .
The batch of parsley was shipped to the Company in 2012 and used in the production of five lots of Honest Kitchen products.
The Honest Kitchen claims to regularly test for Salmonella and other pathogens as part of its quality control process — and has not received to date received any reports of illness associated with these product lots.
The Company is proceeding with this action to ensure the safety and quality of its products.
According to Lucy Postins, company founder and CEO…
“While our quality control tests did not find evidence of Salmonella in any of our finished products, we are accountable for everything we make, and are taking precautionary action to ensure the safety and integrity of our products.”
What’s Being Recalled?
The lots being recalled are:

honest-kitchen-recall-lot-info-2-21-2013

What to Do?
Consumers who purchased the above lots of Honest Kitchen Verve, Zeal or Thrive products should stop feeding the products to their pets, remove the UPC (bar code) and lot code from the packaging, and discard the contents in a covered trash receptacle.
Lot codes are located on the top of product boxes either adjacent to or opposite the UPC.
For questions, consumers are invited to call the company at (866) 437-9729. Or send an email to info@thehonestkitchen.com.
Customer service representatives will be available Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4 pm PST.
You can report complaints about FDA-regulated pet food products by calling the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.
Or go to http://www.fda.gov/petfoodcomplaints.

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