Category Archives: Pet Love

Happy Dog Mom Day🐾🐾

Here’s the anthem for all the women who love taking care of their pups like LADY BOSSES

#MothersDay #DogPeopleGetIt #HWHD # HappyDogMomDay

If You’re A Dog Mom


Anthem for all the women who love taking care of their pups like LADY BOSSES. To download the track go to the playlist below, right click the blue text below to open the file in a new tab and then hit the download arrow!

Lyrics:
Wake up in the morning my dog’s on a routine

Walk him in my jammies don’t care if I’m seen
Covered in fur, poop bags in my pocket

I know I look good so don’t get a red rocket.
Casually strollin with a turd in my hand

Wondering where the hell’s the closest trash can
Peeing everywhere Brooklyn Bridge to the Rockies

He’s Markin’ territory – s’what we do on our walkies
Never leave the house without my lint roller

Hell yea I got a geriatric pug in this stroller (Kirnan with Noodle in a stroller)
His instagram is popping I don’t mean maybe

He gets more likes than my sister’s baby
If you’re a dog mom here’s your camera roll

It’s just my dog’s face no matter how far you scroll
Storage is full? I’m like, psh, Siri please.

That’s why I rock him on my wall, shirt and keys
CHORUS:

If you’re a dog mom, put your hands up

This song’s for all the ladies who provide for their pup
When you’re a dog mom this is what you do

Cause they say your not my baby and I know it ain’t true
Went to the vet cause her poop was volcanic

We put her on a diet now that shit is organic
Bought him elevated bowls I’m a boss breadwinner

Now he doesn’t strain his neck while he’s eating his dinner
Toys & chews that’s where I’m throwin’ my paper

Don’t forget treats! It’s turkey-duck flavor
We poppin’ bottle service at the dog-friendly joints

if i cant bring my dog then I just don’t see the point
Here’s an invitation and don’t be tardy

I’m goin’ all out for my dog’s birthday party
Show up lookin fly & we’re sippin’ on Titos (Zoe)

She’s the life of the party: “And her paws smell like Fritos!”
CHORUS:

If you’re a dog mom, put your hands up

This song’s for all the ladies who provide for their pup
When you’re a dog mom this is what you do

Cause they say your not my baby and I know it ain’t true
Feeling mad pride when he rips out the stuffin’, i even give props when he doesn’t do nuthin

*spoken* You’re amazing
On my nanny cam while I’m in a board meeting,

Wonder what she’s doing “OH GOD WHAT ARE YOU EATING”
Reunited coming home, yo that shit is sacred

When i take off her collar, it looks like she’s naked!
So bomb at belly scratches, i’m like a dog masseuse

And I know he ‘ppreciates cause he brings me his Moose!
Don’t need a man when i come home

Cause my bed is a literal bone zone.
Fall asleep to the sound of you licking your parts

But you wake us both up when you’re scared of your farts
Can’t wait to wake up and do it over again

Say it with me now: DOGS ARE WOMAN’S BEST FRIEND
Ha! Ha! We out!

But we immediately want to come back in again.

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Now It’s Time For WTF Moments In DogDome….

This Doggy Do!!!…….” I don’t know what Mommy was Thinking….”


 

The Morning After….

 

TransvestDog?!?!

 

Next Time..Doggy Language..And I’ll Stiil Do What I Want🐾🐾🐾🐾


 

Dude..Dog..Crotches Off Limits….

 

It’s Been A Hard Doggie Night…


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Hey I Gotta Work Hard For My Money Too!

 

Ummm…Yeah We Don’t Know What’s Going On….. 

 

Who’s Trying To Be Who?!…


 

Desperate Times Calls For Desperate Measures…Doggie is My Prom Date <sigh>

10 Signs Your Cat is Your Boss – Yeah That’s Right!!  

We think that we are in charge of our beloved kitty furballs, but no, believe me when  I tell that the little cuties rule the roost and have you all worked out.  Here are some images that just go to prove that your cat is more than likely your boss, I have long accepted that I am employed by two cute girly cats for their every want, need and desire (“treats yes I know, I’m coming now!!)  continue to the next page for cats in charge.

 

 

1.  “You want to wear something out of here, sorry I’m sitting find something else”

 

2.   “huh hmmm, human I have made this mess, please come and tidy it up”

 

  

3.  “Hey We have finished this one, bring some more”

 

 

4.  “Emergency 911, we have a empty bowl about to go down, get back up to refill it now”

 

5.  “We need to talk!!  It’s either me or the internet- now choose me already”

 

 

6.  “When I said it’s dinner time, I mean’t it, or I’ll eat your shirt”

 

 

7.  “So you’ve been petting another cat!  we need to talk about your priorities”

 

8.  “How many times, this is my chair, not yours, MINE!!”

 

 

9.  “This is my not impressed face, I suggest you fix it immediately”

 

 

10.  “That’s right, I’m monitoring your performance covertly, I’m so in charge here”

 

 

Here Are A Few Brilliant Ways Cats Are Secretly Helping Their Owners Live Healthier Lives

This is an article  found The Huffington Post that I thought Cat Lovers might enjoy!! Happy Easter Everyone!!

 

 

 Here are a few brilliant ways cats are secretly helping their owners live healthier lives

Curator : Kit Sudol

Cats.

The Internet loves ’em. You probably have a family member that has at least 20 of them and maybe sends you cat photos every day. If you don’t have that family member, then you probably are that family member (just a heads up).

Anyway, most folks agree that cats are pretty amazing. But here’s the thing: There’s more to cats than videos of them hanging out in boxes or memes about having a cheeseburger. In fact, cats can do so much more than entertain the Internet.

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(“I’m just a kitten on the Internet tryna have a good time.”)

FACT: Cats can help you live longer.

It’s true! And before you go off to your local shelter to adopt a zillion of them in hopes of becoming some kind of immortal cat-themed super-villain, let’s put our protective safety goggles on and dig into some science facts. (And then we can talk about adopting cats and/or villainy!)

 

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(I mean, we were all thinking about Catwoman here, right?)

How does this work? Well, cat purrs actually promote healing.
We all know what cat purrs are, although veterinarians aren’t entirely sure what the deal is them — and no, that’s not a setup for a Jerry Seinfeld-style joke

 

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(I am so, so sorry.)

They really aren’t sure why cats purr. Some suggest cats do it when they’re content, which makes sense. But they also purr when they’re injured or scared, which probably means they aren’t content. Like, at all.
But … what’s the science?

FACT: It turns out that those cute cat purrs exist in a super-special vibration range that has the potential to be medically therapeutic.

Your average house cat’s purr has a frequency between 25 and 150 Hertz. That’s interesting because that’s also the frequency at which muscles and bones are able to best repair themselves. So cats might be self-healing.
But that’s not all: Those super-special, super-adorable cat purr vibrations also exist at a frequency that’s good for humans too. The Fauna Communications Research Institute found that every single cat in their study had purr vibrations well within the “medically therapeutic” range (20-140 Hertz).

What does this mean?

Uh, well, that your purring cat can help with bone and muscle repair, pain relief, dyspnea (shortness of breath), and so. Much. More.
And that’s just the tip of the iceberg.
FACT: Owning a cat may mean less stress in your life.

Well, unless your cat likes to jump out and scare you (like mine)

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(Pictured: My cat hiding in a paper bag. Because why not?)

But science says that in studies about pet owners versus non-pet owners, folks who owned cats had significantly fewer stress symptoms. Dog owners were #2 in low stress. And in last place? People without any pets.
And here’s the kicker: Owning a pet (cats and dogs) in general reduced stress-related blood pressure more than medication designed specifically to do that (aka ACE inhibitors).

Now, having way lower stress because of an adorable little fuzzball in your life is actually a really big deal health-wise because…

FACT: Cats can reduce the likelihood of having a heart attack! By 40%!

The University of Minnesota found that owning a cat might actually be good for your heart, and not just in an, “Oh my gosh, I am just so overwhelmed with love for this animal!” kind of heart stuff way.
In their study, they found that folks who did not own a cat were 40% more likely to have a heart attack and had a 30% higher chance of dying from heart disease than cat owners did. Which is just like … what?!
So, why is this? Well, researchers at the University of Minnesota said this:
“If we assume that cat ownership is directly responsible for the benefits, then the most logical explanation may be that cat ownership may relieve stress and anxiety and subsequently reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases.”
See? Less stress, less anxiety = fewer heart and blood pressure issues. Also, probably more tripping over cat toys at two in the morning, but I couldn’t find anything about that in the study. Oops.

FACT: Correlation doesn’t always equal causation…

… as my former stats professor used to say.
Yes, studies have found that cats can reduce stress, the likelihood of cardiovascular disease, and even potentially give you some purr therapy, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that you should quit your job and hang out in a cave with some cats to live forever.
In fact, these findings could say more about the lifestyles of the average cat owner than the mystical powers cats have over the human body.
But, still, these studies are pretty compelling, and hey, if that means I can go around telling people that cats are actually magic, then I’m totally down, y’all.

(That cat is performing magic behind me, obviously.)

So, yeah. Cats? Adorable little monsters who just want your love and they also can heal you (maybe). And now for the infographic to prove it, just in case all this wordsmithin’ isn’t enough and you need some fun visuals to really get the point across.

  

Aww, yes, that information looks even better in infographic form.

But you know what’s better than infographics? 

Adopting a cat from your local shelter!

According to the ASPCA, 7.6 million animals are put in shelters every year, and of those, 3.4 million are cats. It gets worse because an astonishing 1.4 million cats are euthanized. That means around 37% of cats in shelters are adopted … while 41% are put down.

So there are wonderful adoptable cats out there, just waiting for your love and time and attention. Actually, there are a ton of them, so if you can, you should totally adopt. And in return? They’ll possibly use their magical healing powers on you … and love you. A lot. And there’s nothing better than that.

If you can’t adopt right now, you can always foster a cat. Or volunteer some of your time at your local animal shelter. Who knows, if you stay there long enough, maybe you too will become immortal.

Hey, it’s worth a shot, right?

 

ABOUT:

Infographic found on Visual.ly, originally created by the talented Gemma BusquetsCatwoman GIF via Giphy. The Jerry Seinfeld meme created with Meme Generator. Thumbnail via Thinkstock. All photos of my cat Scout were lovingly taken by me. No Scouts were harmed in the writing of this article.

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Primal Pet Foods Issues Recall of Raw Cat Food

 

Primal Pet Foods, a California-based pet food manufacturer, has announced the voluntary recall of a single lot of Feline Turkey Raw Frozen Cat Food due to reports of low thiamine levels in the food.

 

According to a department release, the FDA tested the product after receiving a consumer complaint concerning 3-pound bags of Primal Pet Foods Feline Turkey Raw Frozen Formula. After testing, the FDA notified Primal Pet Foods that the testing of two bags of this lot showed a low thiamine level.

 

The lot involved in the recall is:

 

Primal Pet Foods Feline Turkey Raw Frozen Formula 3-pound bag 

(UPC# 8 50334-00414 0) 

Best By date 060815 

Production Code – B22

 

Only the product with the above best-by date and production code is included in the cat food recall. Consumers are advised to check the production code on the back of the Primal Pet Foods bag to determine if the product has been recalled.

 

Cats fed diets low in thiamine for an extended period may be at risk for developing a thiamine deficiency. Symptoms of an affected cat can be gastrointestinal or neurological in nature, and early signs of thiamine deficiencymay include decreased appetite, salivation, vomiting, and weight loss. In advanced cases, neurologic signs can develop, which may include ventriflexion (bending towards the floor) of the neck, wobbly walking, circling, falling, and seizures.

 

Consumers who purchased 3-pound bags of the recalled cat food are advised to stop feeding it to their cats and call Primal Pet Foods at 1-866-566-4652Monday through Friday, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm (PST). Those with cats which have consumed food from the recalled lot and which are displaying symptoms mentioned above are urged to contact their veterinarian. If treated promptly, thiamine deficiency is typically reversible. 

Walking Your Dog : It’s Important, Do It Well

Most dog breeds were developed with a specific purpose in mind, for example, sporting, working, herding and so forth. Consequently, whether your pet is a purebred or mixed breed, chances are he carries genetic traits that drive him to pursue an activity.

Many modern day dogs don’t get opportunities to do what their breed instincts tell them to do. In addition, it’s a rare dog that exercises on his own, and your backyard doesn’t provide the variety of sensory stimulation most dogs need to ward off boredom.

Dogs need walks for both exercise and mental stimulation.

According to Clinician’s Brief:

Generally, people walk their dog for 4 reasons: elimination, mental stimulation, exercise, and training. Dogs like to go for walks to get outdoors, sniff and engage with their environment, exercise, and perhaps socialize with people and dogs outside the home. There is no reason that a walk cannot encompass and meet all the needs of both humans and dogs. Because time is often at a premium, it is useful to help owners understand and find creative ways to meet these needs.

Why and how to walk your dog may seem like a ‘no brainer’ topic to many of you, but the fact is there are lots of pet owners who:

  • Don’t walk their dogs at all, or don’t do it routinely
  • Don’t make the most of the activity
  • Dread walks because their pet actually walks them, or exhibits other bad leash manners


Before You Head Out the Door

The best way to develop a positive dog walking habit is when your pet is a puppy.As soon as her immune system is strong enough to protect her from communicable disease (discuss when it’s safe to take your pup outside with your vet) , she’s ready for walks with you or other family members.She should already have her own secure-fitting collar or harness and ID tag, and sheshould be used to wearing it before you attempt to take her for walks. Some puppies have no problem wearing a collar; others do. If your dog is fighting it, as long as you’re sure it isn’t too tight (youshould be able to easily slip your fingers under it) or uncomfortable for some other reason, distract her from fussing with her collar until she gets used to it. It shouldn’t take more thana couple days for your pup to forget she’s even wearing it.Don’t try to take your pup for a walk if she protests wearing a collar. Get her used to wearing her collar first.If you plan to use a head halter or harness for walks (which I recommend for any dog at risk of injury from pulling against a collar/leash combination), the next step is to get your puppy comfortable wearing it. As with the collar, this needs to happen before you attempt to attach a leash and head out the door.Once wearing her collar and a halter or harness (if you choose) is second nature to your dog, you’re ready for the next step. Attach about four feet of light line — cotton awning cord or light cotton rope will do – and let your puppy drag it around the house with her under your watchful eye, of course. She’ll get used to it being attached, as well as the tug of it when she steps on it.Once your pup is used to the four-foot line, swap it for a 10 to 15 foot line of the same material, and head outdoors.

Starting Off on the Right Foot

Initial walks should be short for most puppies – the main goal is to get your dog used to being attached to you by a lead.

Find a safe environment. Allow puppy to drag the line behind him for a bit, then pick up the opposite end. Let him lead you around for a few seconds while you hold the line just off the ground. Slow down so he’s forced to slow down, ultimately to a stop. Take a short break for praise and a little playtime.

Next, let him trail the line again, but when you pick up your end this time, call him and stand still. If he pulls, hold your ground without pulling him in your direction. The goal is to teach him to put slack in the line himself by moving toward you. When he puts slack in the line, praise him and call him to you.

If he comes all the way to you, more praise and a training treat are in order. If he stops on his way to you, tighten the line just enough to apply a tiny bit of pull to it. Immediately call him to come again. Give praise as he moves toward you and treats when he comes all the way back.

Two or three repetitions is all many puppies need to understand lack of tension in the line is what earns praise and treats.

When your pup has learned to come towards you to relieve tension on the line, you can begin backing up as he’s coming towards you to keep him moving. 

Next, turn and walk forward so he’s following you. If he passes you, head in another direction so he’s again behind you.

The goal is to teach him to follow on a loose lead. Once you’ve accomplished the goal, you can continue to use the light line or replace it with a leash.

Depending on your pet’s temperament, five to 15 minute sessions are sufficient in the beginning. Practice controlling your dog on the lead for 30 second intervals during each session. Exercise patience and don’t engage in a battle of wills with your pup. Don’t snap, yank or otherwise use the line for correction or punishment. Stop before either of you gets frazzled or tired. 

After each short session on the lead, liberally praise your dog and spend a few minutes playing ball or some other game he enjoys. Remember — you’re building the foundation for an activity both you and your dog will enjoy and look forward to throughout her life.

Problem Pullers

Some puppies stubbornly fight the pressure of the line rather than create slack.

If your puppy freezes on a tight line or routinely pulls against it, my first recommendation is to use a halter or harness rather than a collar attached to the lead. Your dog can create serious neck and cervical disk problems by pulling on a collar/leash combination.

Next, make sure it’s not you creating the problem. Our human instinct is to hold the leash taught, so you must also train yourself to keep slack in the line. Your dog’s natural response to a tight line is to pull against it. 

Next do the following when your puppy refuses to create slack or move toward you:

  • Maintain the tension on the line and turn your back on her. Allow time for it to occur to her she can’t win by pulling against you.
  • Remain still with your back to her holding the tension in the line – don’t jerk the line, don’t pull or yank her toward you, and don’t put slack in the line yourself, which will teach her the way to get slack is to pull at the line.

The message you want to send your pup is pulling on the lead doesn’t accomplish a thing. It doesn’t change the scenery and it doesn’t earn praise or treats. Eventually, your puppy will stop doing what doesn’t work – especially when she is consistently rewarded for desirable behavior.

The very first second you begin leash training, make sure your puppy accomplishes nothing by pulling on her line. It takes some dogs longer than others to learn to keep the leash loose, but with patience and persistence, any puppy can learn to follow on a loose lead.

Different Types of Dog Walks

Once your dog has been taught good leash manners, I recommend you vary the purpose of your walks with him.

If your habit is to walk him to his potty spot to relieve himself, that’s a purposeful walk – usually of short duration.
Then there are mentally stimulating walks during which your pup is allowed to stop, sniff, investigate, mark a spot and so forth. Most dogs on a leash don’t spend as much time sniffing and investigating as off-leash dogs. (This is probably because leashed dogs sense their owners aren’t really into the same things they are!)
Allowing your pet some time to sniff around and investigate is good for him mentally. Dogs gain knowledge of the world through their noses. You can train your dog with commands to know when he’s out for a mental stimulation walk, a training walk or an exercise session.

Regular exercise is a necessity for your dog, the natural athlete. Regardless of his size, breed, gender or even his age, he needs physical activity in order to be a balanced, healthy animal. Exercise will keep his frame strong, his weight in the healthy range, and it can also help prevent or alleviate arthritis and other degenerative joint diseases.
Exercise consistency is really important. Dogs need exercise every three days, minimum, in order to maintain muscle tone and prevent muscle wasting. In my opinion, consistent daily aerobic exercise should be the goal. It’s important to elevate your pet’s heart rate for 20 minutes during exercise sessions. If your dog is out of shape, you’ll need to start slow and build gradually to 20 minutes per session.

Ongoing training throughout your dog’s life is a great way to keep his faculties sharp and boredom at bay. It’s also a wonderful way to strengthen the bond between you and your pet.
Training walks can be about improving leash manners, learning basic or advanced obedience commands, ongoing socialization – just about anything you can think of that can be done on a leashed walk.

Your dog depends on you for her quality of life. Walking her every day or at least several times each week – taking advantage of different types of walks to stimulate her mentally and physically – will help your canine companion be balanced, healthy and happy for a lifetime.

 

 

Ten Most WTF Pet Pics…..

1. This dog who might also be Harry Styles.

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2. This dog who’s been chosen by the thug life.

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3. This pair of steamy seductresses.

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4. Ummmm…OK

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5. This pair of relaxing guinea pigs enjoying a refreshing summer cocktail.

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6. These real-life dogs at a poker table.

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7. This pony who found himself in this terrible bucket situation.

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8. This very angry turtle on a tricycle.

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9. Whatever this sock monster is.

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10. And this baked potato.

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Want To Know The Best Things About Men Who Love Cats? Chime In!

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I remember when I was 12 years old and how my love for animals started growing more. I wanted a cat. My Dad didn’t want cats in the house. And my mother is really not fond of animals. So do you know what they told me to dissuade me from wanting a cat ? They said ,” Real Men don’t like cats! “And that I would run the risk of becoming the old lady with a bunch of cats that no man would want. What a cruel thing to say to an adolescent! I LOVE animals with no regret . I’m different from my parents. Well do you know what I told them? I said , ” Any man that judges a woman negatively because her heart is more than big enough to love other species, is no real man. And definitely not one I would want!” Yes, I’ve been called eccentric because I never back down from what I believe in. I adore men that love animals . I love men that love cats. Check out , what is great about these manly men and chime in yourself!!

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There is a trend that celebrates confident men who adore and appreciate their feline friends for what they are: wonderful, caring little companions. We’re taking our turn to share what we consider the best things about fellas who care for kitties.

They Respect Moods

Even the friendliest cats sometimes don’t feel very amiable. Cat guys understand how quickly the tables can turn during a belly rub bonding session and are cool with a sudden “don’t touch me” attitude. Those mature men know when to lay off and when to welcome their cats back into their lap for snuggles.

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They’re Responsible

Although some people believe that cats are easy to care for, cat men know that, while a cat may not need to be walked or let out several times a day, felines need attention, companionship and love. Plus, cat guys scoop the litterbox. Need we say more?

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They Appreciate Multi-Dimensional Personalities

Cats are sweet, standoffish, lazy, active, boring, funny and so much more all rolled into one. Men who love cats obviously appreciate the complexity of the feline personality. The accepting and flexible nature of such men likely spills over into their human relationships, as well.

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They Have a Sense of Humor

You have to have a sense of humor if you own a cat. Men who love cats appreciate the funny things cats do, even if the cat doesn’t mean to be funny. Cat guys laugh at the middle-of-the-night races to nowhere. They giggle at the stalking and pouncing on invisible prey. They chuckle at the 4 a.m. wake-up calls. They get a kick out of the cat lounging on the morning newspaper (or keyboard or anything else taking dad’s attention away from kitty). Guys with a good sense of humor are always more fun to be around — especially if they have a cat on their lap!

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They’re Good Guys

Bottom line: A cat guy is a guy who loves animals, and what’s not to love about that? P.S. : I have a family of my own now. We have two cats. And guess who is madly in love with both? That’s right my parents :))  it’s really hard not to.

11 Dog Quotes That Will Melt Your Heart

11 Dog Quotes That Will Melt Your Heart
If your heart doesn’t swell when looking at these adorable dogs, we don’t know what will.

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Choosing A Pet Sitter

 

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Choosing a Pet Sitter

Pet sitters do much more than provide your pet with food and water while you’re away

Pet sitters do much more than provide a pet with food and water while their guardian is away from home.

A good pet sitter also spends quality time with the animal, gives him exercise and knows how to tell if he needs veterinary attention. What’s more, pet sitters typically offer additional services, such as taking in mail and newspapers and watering plants.
But just because someone calls herself a pet sitter doesn’t mean she’s qualified to do the job.

Why hire a pet sitter?

A pet sitter—a professional, qualified individual paid to care for your pet—offers both you and your pet many benefits.

Your pet gets:

The environment he knows best.
His regular diet and routine.
Relief from traveling to and staying in an unfamiliar place with other animals (such as a boarding kennel).
Attention while you’re away.

You get:

Happier friends and neighbors, who aren’t burdened with caring for your pet.
The peace of mind that comes from knowing that your pet is being cared for by a professional.
Someone to bring in your newspaper and mail so potential burglars don’t know you’re away.
Someone who will come to your home so you don’t have to drive your pet to a boarding kennel.
Other services provided by most pet sitters, such as plant watering and pet grooming.

Where do I find a pet sitter?

Start with a recommendation from a friend, neighbor, veterinarian, humane society or dog trainer. Check online or in the Yellow Pages under “Pet Sitting Services.” You can also contact the National Association of Professional Pet Sitters (856-439-0324) or Pet Sitters International (336-983-9222).

What should I look for?

It’s important to learn all you can about a prospective pet sitters’ qualifications and services. Before selecting a pet sitter, interview the candidates over the phone or at your home. Find out the following:
Can the pet sitter provide written proof that she has commercial liability insurance (to cover accidents and negligence) and is bonded (to protect against theft by a pet sitter or her employees)?
What training has the pet sitter completed?
Will the pet sitter record notes about your pet—such as his likes, dislikes, fears, habits, medical conditions, medications, and routines?
Is the pet sitter associated with a veterinarian who can provide emergency services?
What will happen if the pet sitter experiences car trouble or becomes ill? Does she have a backup?
Will the pet sitter provide related services such as in-home grooming, dog walking, dog training and play time?
Will the pet sitter provide a written service contract spelling out services and fees?
If the pet sitter provides live-in services, what are the specific times she agrees to be with your pet? Is this detailed in the contract?
How does your pet sitter make sure that you have returned home?
Will the pet sitter provide you with the phone numbers of other clients who have agreed to serve as references?
Even if you like what you hear from the pet sitter and from her references, it’s important to have the prospective pet sitter come to your home to meet your pet before actually hiring her for a pet-sitting job. Watch how she interacts with your pet—does your pet seem comfortable with the person? If this visit goes well, start by hiring the pet sitter to care for your pet during a short trip, such as a weekend excursion. That way, you can work out any problems before leaving your beloved pet in the pet sitter’s care for longer periods.

Helping the pet sitter and your pet

Of course, even the most trustworthy, experienced pet sitter will have trouble if you haven’t also kept your end of the bargain. Here are your responsibilities:
Make reservations with your pet sitter early, especially during holidays.
Ensure your pet is well socialized and allows strangers to handle him.
Affix current identification tags to your pet’s collar.
Maintain current vaccinations for your pet.
Leave clear instructions detailing specific pet-care responsibilities and emergency contact information, including how to reach you and your veterinarian.
Leave pet food and supplies in one place.
Buy extra pet supplies in case you’re away longer than planned.
Leave a key with a trustworthy neighbor as a backup, and give him and your pet sitter each other’s phone numbers. Be sure those extra keys work before giving them out.
Show the pet sitter your home’s important safety features such as the circuit breaker and security system.

Finally, have a safe and fun trip. And remember to bring your pet sitter’s phone number in case your plans change—or you just want to find out how Fluffy and Fido are doing.