Category Archives: Frostbite

Winter Boredom? Fun Exercises To Keep Your Dog Active & Fit During The Cold Season

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I posted the picture above to represent the winter season. In reality, I live in the South but this picture symbolizes how we deal with the cold season. There are many pet parents like myself that feel guilty when our active life with our pets decreases. Our pets get lazy, a little overweight and bored. Well, I want to help all of us out of our runt. No matter what’s going on in any of our lives, let’s make sure one of our priorities is keeping our pets happy through vested activities.
The winter season puts our dogs at risk for many illnesses. The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention estimates over half of all dogs in the United States are overweight or obese and have an increased risk of injury, disease and shortened life expectancy. Yes FiFi looks cute and cozy in their pet beds or your bed but believe me having some exercise with their favorite person will make them come alive. It will also prolong their health and lives. So what are these activities you say. I have 6 great activities you and your fur baby will enjoy.

Six Exercises Your Dog Will Love

1. Treadmills

Dog or human treadmills work well to exercise your dog. Start slowly with your dog on a leash and use high-value treats as motivation. After your dog is comfortable walking slowly, gradually increase the speed to a trot. Always stay with your dog to watch him closely. Never tether your dog to a treadmill or force him to stay on it. If your dog doesn’t seem to enjoy the treadmill, find another form of exercise.

2. Stair Climbing

If your dog is young, healthy and not prone to hip problems, throw a ball or toy up to the top of carpeted stairs for an aerobic game of fetch. Just be careful not to overdo exercising on the stairs. Stair climbing is also a quick way to develop your leg muscles quickly.

3. Train with Tricks

Try some new training techniques or reinforce any existing commands or training that need more work. Teach your dog some tricks. If your dog already knows the basic tricks, try teaching him something to help out around the house, such as picking up his toys and putting them in a basket. Most dogs like to learn something new and it’s a great way to bond with your dog.

4.Doggie Gyms

These gyms are popping up all over the country and if there’s one close to you, they offer various ways to exercise your dog. Some even have swimming pools and indoor dog parks.

5. Dog Walkers

If you really hate walking outside in the winter or don’t have enough time to exercise your dog, hire a recommended and reliable dog walker. Make sure they are from a formal company. And also make sure they are insured and bonded. Check out the services we offer : HWHD Services & Fees. This will give you an idea of what activities you would want no matter what part of the country reside.

6. Play Dates

Get together with friends who have dogs that want to exercise, play and socialize. Better yet, host a play date in your home and make some homemade dog treats for your dog to share with his friends.

Bonus:  More Winter Season Activities

Anyone live up north, the Midwest or Canada. Here are some other Great Ideas!

1. Snow Hikes

Head out for a hike in a wooded area after a fresh snowfall. It’s beautiful and serene since most people don’t take advantage of hiking trails in the winter. It’s also the perfect time to use off-leash areas where your dog can have more freedom without running into too many other dogs or people.

2. Sledding and Snowball Fights

Have your dog join you for some childhood fun in the snow.

3. Dog Parks
If your dog gets overwhelmed by crowded dog parks, try visiting in the winter when there are fewer people and dogs at the park. Hint: Pro Petsitters love an afternoon in dog parks.

4. Snowshoeing or Cross-Country Skiing

Enjoy these sports if you have a snow-loving dog.

5. Skijoring

Have you ever heard of Skijoring? Skijoring is having your dog pull you through the snow while you’re wearing skis. It sounds like a lot of fun if you have a snow-loving dog that can safely pull you.

Winter Advice To Keep Your Dog Safe During The Cold

Short-haired, small or elderly dogs may need a water-repellent coat to help keep them warm.

Trim the hair between your dog’s toes to reduce snow and ice buildup.

Dog booties can keep paws dry and free from ice, salt or de-icing chemicals

If your dog hates booties, apply Musher’s Secret wax to his paws before going outside to prevent painful ice balls from forming between his toes. Musher’s Secret also protects paws from hot pavement or beach sand in the summer.

If you don’t use booties, clean your pup’s paws with a warm wet cloth when you return home to remove any salt, de-icing chemicals or ice balls. Also wipe down their legs and belly.

Use reflective wear or clip-on LED collar lights if you walk outside after dark.

Consult with your vet if you have any concerns about exercising your dog outside when it’s cold.

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Get Your Pet WinterProofed 2015

frostbitecat

Frostbite takes paws of cat

By: Tanya Stroman

Many times, particularly in the south, we will coop ourselves and our pets in the house to avoid any dangers during this time. But don’t let the weather control the exercise and quality time your pets should be enjoying.

I am no way saying that your pets should be locked outside . Yes , in my opinion that’s abuse. But our pets aren’t feeble beings and there are ways for them to enjoy themselves during the winter months with creativity and safety precautions in use.

Winter has the benefit of being a great time to enjoy fresh air and exercise. I am going to provide you with precautions for you and your pet to keep safe during this time. Here is a top list of advice to help your pets cope with winter weather.

1) One misconception among people is that cats and dogs can withstand cold temperatures simply because they have fur. Let’s straighten this out now, while it’s true that some large dog breeds are well equipped for the cold weather, others are more sensitive. Provide your fair-weathered pets with a coat and boots.

2) I am not a believer in keeping my cats outdoors. That’s for several reasons. Yet I do understand some owners don’t mind their cats outside for a couple of hours. Know this, cats usually don’t stay outdoors for long when it’s very cold. Yes their temperament for cold is the same as ours. They will protect themselves from cold weather so help them. Always check the upcoming forecast before letting your cat out. If you are not going to be home to let your cat back into the house, don’t let it out.

20130227-181501.jpg

A list of winter-related conditions to watch out for in your pet:

Frostbite

When animals are exposed to freezing temperatures for an extended period, they are vulnerable to frostbite on their extremities, including ear tips, foot pads and belly. When a dog or cat is exposed to cold temperatures, its body reacts in stages:

1) Your pet’s fur provides insulation just like us when wearing a coat. Their hairs, when exposed to cold air, undergo pilo-erection. This is like you and I getting goose bumps. The hairs “stand up” trapping the air in that layer. This air is warmed by the body and adds additional insulation.

2) When the body’s core temperature decreases, an involuntary reflex by the skeletal muscles known as “shivering” is triggered to generate heat and warm you up. Animals, like humans, experience this same reaction.

3) When the body is really getting cold and the animal’s life may be at risk, the body responds by vasoconstricting the peripheral tissues. This means the body is being selective in where it is sending warm blood.
The organs are the most important to keep both an animal and human alive so that blood is circulating in the core of the body (heart, liver, kidney lungs,) and shuts down temporally by constricting blood vessels to the extremities until the body’s normal temperature is attained.

4) If a cat or dog is still exposed to the cold by this stage, frostbite will develop. In extreme cases, frostbite can mean the loss of limbs, toes and ear tips.

If you suspect your animal is suffering from frostbite, start administering first aid immediately to avoid permanent damage. Please ensure you seek veterinary assistance as frostbite can be dangerous if left untreated.

Here are some first aid tips to keep your pet safe:

1) Warm the affected area slowly with warm water using towels.

2) If it is a limb or paw that is frozen, soak it only in a bath or bowl of warm water

3) Dry gently after you have the warmed the area

4) Do not rub or massage the frozen tissue.

5) Do not apply snow or ice.

6) Do not immerse your pet completely in a bath this will cause the body temperature to decrease and cause hypothermia.

Hypothermia

Make sure that frostbite is treated. If frostbite goes untreated, hypothermia can develop. Hypothermia is an abnormal lowering of the body’s temperature. This is a serious condition that can cause unconsciousness, shock and even the death of a pet. Be careful, however, as frostbite alone is not a guaranteed precursor to hypothermia.

If you suspect hypothermia, it is best to seek medical treatment from your veterinarian as this condition can worsen without proper care. While they are being transported to the veterinarian there are a number of methods you can use to stabilize your pet :

1) Warm your pet slowly using blankets
2) Put warm water in plastic bottles then wrap in towels to prevent burns.
3) Use plastic zip lock bags filled with uncooked rice that you warm in the microwave for 1-2 minutes then wrap in a towel.

Conclusion

• Provide winter footwear for pets – they may squirm and make a fuss at first, but their paws will thank you!
• Avoid too much walking on salt – wipe your pet’s feet!
• Don’t leave pets in the car during cold weather
• Keep pets away from the fireplace

20130227-181344.jpg

 

Get Your Pet WinterProofed

frostbitecat

Frostbite takes paws of cat

By: Tanya Stroman

Many times, particularly in the south, we will coop ourselves and our pets in the house to avoid any dangers during this time. But don’t let the weather control the exercise and quality time your pets should be enjoying.

I am no way saying that your pets should be locked outside . Yes , in my opinion that’s abuse. But our pets aren’t feeble beings and there are ways for them to enjoy themselves during the winter months with creativity and safety precautions in use.

Winter has the benefit of being a great time to enjoy fresh air and exercise. I am going to provide you with precautions for you and your pet to keep safe during this time. Here is a top list of advice to help your pets cope with winter weather.

1) One misconception among people is that cats and dogs can withstand cold temperatures simply because they have fur. Let’s straighten this out now, while it’s true that some large dog breeds are well equipped for the cold weather, others are more sensitive. Provide your fair-weathered pets with a coat and boots.

2) I am not a believer in keeping my cats outdoors. That’s for several reasons. Yet I do understand some owners don’t mind their cats outside for a couple of hours. Know this, cats usually don’t stay outdoors for long when it’s very cold. Yes their temperament for cold is the same as ours. They will protect themselves from cold weather so help them. Always check the upcoming forecast before letting your cat out. If you are not going to be home to let your cat back into the house, don’t let it out.

20130227-181501.jpg

A list of winter-related conditions to watch out for in your pet:

Frostbite

When animals are exposed to freezing temperatures for an extended period, they are vulnerable to frostbite on their extremities, including ear tips, foot pads and belly. When a dog or cat is exposed to cold temperatures, its body reacts in stages:

1) Your pet’s fur provides insulation just like us when wearing a coat. Their hairs, when exposed to cold air, undergo pilo-erection. This is like you and I getting goose bumps. The hairs “stand up” trapping the air in that layer. This air is warmed by the body and adds additional insulation.

2) When the body’s core temperature decreases, an involuntary reflex by the skeletal muscles known as “shivering” is triggered to generate heat and warm you up. Animals, like humans, experience this same reaction.

3) When the body is really getting cold and the animal’s life may be at risk, the body responds by vasoconstricting the peripheral tissues. This means the body is being selective in where it is sending warm blood.
The organs are the most important to keep both an animal and human alive so that blood is circulating in the core of the body (heart, liver, kidney lungs,) and shuts down temporally by constricting blood vessels to the extremities until the body’s normal temperature is attained.

4) If a cat or dog is still exposed to the cold by this stage, frostbite will develop. In extreme cases, frostbite can mean the loss of limbs, toes and ear tips.

If you suspect your animal is suffering from frostbite, start administering first aid immediately to avoid permanent damage. Please ensure you seek veterinary assistance as frostbite can be dangerous if left untreated.

Here are some first aid tips to keep your pet safe:

1) Warm the affected area slowly with warm water using towels.

2) If it is a limb or paw that is frozen, soak it only in a bath or bowl of warm water

3) Dry gently after you have the warmed the area

4) Do not rub or massage the frozen tissue.

5) Do not apply snow or ice.

6) Do not immerse your pet completely in a bath this will cause the body temperature to decrease and cause hypothermia.

Hypothermia

Make sure that frostbite is treated. If frostbite goes untreated, hypothermia can develop. Hypothermia is an abnormal lowering of the body’s temperature. This is a serious condition that can cause unconsciousness, shock and even the death of a pet. Be careful, however, as frostbite alone is not a guaranteed precursor to hypothermia.

If you suspect hypothermia, it is best to seek medical treatment from your veterinarian as this condition can worsen without proper care. While they are being transported to the veterinarian there are a number of methods you can use to stabilize your pet :

1) Warm your pet slowly using blankets
2) Put warm water in plastic bottles then wrap in towels to prevent burns.
3) Use plastic zip lock bags filled with uncooked rice that you warm in the microwave for 1-2 minutes then wrap in a towel.

Conclusion

• Provide winter footwear for pets – they may squirm and make a fuss at first, but their paws will thank you!
• Avoid too much walking on salt – wipe your pet’s feet!
• Don’t leave pets in the car during cold weather
• Keep pets away from the fireplace

20130227-181344.jpg