Category Archives: Cats

First Aid Tips for Cat Guardians that could save a Kittie’s Life this Summer by Blue Cross -by Katzenworld

Source: First Aid Tips for Cat Guardians that could save a Kittie’s Life this Summer by Blue Cross – Katzenworld

Fourth Of July Pet Safety Tips🇺🇸

First, I apologize to All potential clients that I did not have a chance to call back or book appointments. We have been BOOKED. Also, in the midst of making many changes . Once everything is settled, I will be back with an Announcement. I DO appreciate all the referrals. I want to at least leave everyone some GREAT tips for the Fourth Of July Weekend 🐾🐶🇺🇸

Safety during July 4th celebrations:


Leave your pets at home when you go to parties, fireworks displays, parades and other gatherings. Loud fireworks, unfamiliar places and crowds can all be very frightening to pets, and there’s great risk of pets becoming spooked and running away.
Consider putting your pets in a safe, escape-proof room or crate during parties and fireworks.

If you’re hosting guests, ask them to help keep an eye on your pets to make sure they don’t escape. Placing notes on exit doors and gates can help both you and your guests remain vigilant.

Keep your pets inside if you or your neighbors are setting off fireworks.

Keep sparklers, glow sticks, fireworks, charcoal and kabob skewers away from curious pets.

Don’t Use Fireworks Near Dogs. While lit fireworks can pose a danger to curious dogs and potentially result in severe burns and/or trauma to the face and paws, even unused fireworks can be hazardous. Some fireworks contain potentially toxic substances such as arsenic, potassium nitrate, and other heavy metals.

Don’t let pets get near your barbecue grill while it is in use or still hot.

Avoid the urge to feed your pets table scraps or other foods intended for people. 

Alcoholic Drinks & Weed Poison Pets. If your pet drinks alcohol, they can become dangerously intoxicated, go into a coma, or in severe cases, die from respiratory failure. Yes, even beer is toxic; fermented hops and ethanol are poisonous to dogs and cats. 

Have your pet properly identified. If your pet manages to break loose and become lost, without proper identification it will be that much harder to get them back. Consider fitting your pet with microchip identification, ID tags with their name and your phone number, or both. It is also a good idea to have a recent picture of your pets in case you have to put up signs.

Remember that too much sun and heat (and humidity!) can be dangerous to pets. Keep them inside when it’s extremely hot/humid; make sure they have access to shady spots and plenty of water when outdoors; don’t leave them outside for extended periods in hot weather.

Never leave your pet in your car when it’s warm outside. Vehicle interiors heat up much faster than the air around them, and even a short time in a locked car can be dangerous to pets.

After the celebrations: 


Check your yard for fireworks debris before allowing pets outside to play or relax. Even if you didn’t set off fireworks yourself, debris can make its way into your yard, where curious animals may pick it up to play with or eat.
If you hosted guests, check both your yard and home for food scraps or other debris that might be dangerous to pets, such as food skewers.
                                    

                               🇺🇸We wish you and your family a happy and safe Fourth of July!🇺🇸

Celebrate Pet Safety This Memorial Day

Great Tips By : ASCPA

As the unofficial start to summer, Memorial Day is a great excuse to get outdoors. But whether you’re partying, barbequing, or just soaking up some rays, it’s important to keep your pet’s safety in mind at all times. To prevent any Memorial Day mishaps, we’ve put together some tips to help protect animals during the “Dog Days” of the season.

Party Smart

Barbequing is one of the best parts of Memorial Day, but remember that the food and drink you serve your guests may be poisonous to pets. Keep alcoholic beverages away from animals, and remind guests not to give them any table scraps or snacks. Raisins, grapes, onions, chocolate, and avocado are all common at barbeques—and they’re all especially toxic to animals.

Be Cool Near the Pool

Don’t leave pets unsupervised around a pool or lake—not all dogs are expert swimmers! Introduce your pets to water gradually and make sure they wear flotation devices when on boats. Also, try to keep your dog from drinking pool water, which contains potentially dangerous chemicals like chlorine.

Skip the Spray

Unless specifically designed for animals, insect repellant and sunscreen can be toxic to pets. Signs of repellent toxicity include drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst, and lethargy. DEET, a common insecticide in products for humans, may cause neurological issues in dogs.

Made in the Shade

Pets can get dehydrated quickly, so if you’re spending time outside, give them plenty of fresh, clean water and make sure they have a shady place to get out of the sun. Note that animals with flat faces, like Pugs and Persian cats, are more susceptible to heat stroke since they cannot pant as effectively. These pets, along with the elderly, the overweight, and those with heart or lung diseases, should be kept cool in air-conditioned rooms as much as possible.  

IDs, Please

Time spent outdoors comes with the added risk of pets escaping. Make sure that your pet is fitted with a microchip or ID tag with identifying information, or both. It’s always better to be safe than sorry.

Opt for a Humane Holiday

Everyone loves a Memorial Day barbecue, but for those who eat meat, eggs or dairy, avoiding the worst factory-farmed products can be tricky. For help making the most compassionate choices this holiday (and all year long!), be sure to reference our humane picnic tips.

Easter Pet Safety Tips 2017

Easter, The Only Time It’s Okay To Put All Your Eggs in One Basket😜

Easter Pet Safety Tips
Sweets: Chocolates are one of the most-well known toxins to pets. It contains Theobromine which can affect the nervous and cardiovascular systems. Be sure to keep all candy out of reach from your pet.
Sugar Substitutes: Xylitol is a common sugar substitute found in products such as sugar-free gum, sugar-free and low carb diabetic candies, and sugar-free baked goods. A small amount can be toxic to dog.

Signs of toxicity in dogs:
-Profound Hypoglycemia
-Weakness/lethargy
-Decreased potassium
-Seizures
-Bleeding
-Liver disease/failure
-Death
Lilies: Lilies are extremely toxic to all pets, especially cats. Ingestion of this toxin results in renal (kidney) failure within 24-48 hours. The best preventative is to not have these plants in the house with your pets.
Easter Grass: The plastic Easter grass found in Easter baskets is appealing to pets, and can cause a life-threatening gastrointestinal obstruction which can require surgery to resolve. Keep Easter grass out of reach of all pets while in the house and dispose of used grass in a pet-proof container.

 

The Loss Of A Dog(Pet)

Hello Everyone,
I hope everyone is having a blessed new year. I haven’t been able to write like I used to because I have a corporate job and running this business at the same time.  Although my year has been okay, one issue I’m mourning is the loss of one my pets.  People who know me, knows I’m energetic and generallly a happy disposition. Right now, I don’t feel that way I never show my depressed to them.  Writing this blog helps me to release my feelings and gain more closure.  Yesterday I read about a cat that had been kidnapped, beaten and tortured. He walked home on broken paws to get home and then died.   Even writing this my heart is so broken over what this cat experienced  as well as the owners. I won’t go into much detail because it’s extremely painful to read about. Today I ran across a blog written by unknown , that helps people understand the feelings people go through when their pets die. I want to share it with this community whose love of animals are even stronger than mine.

LoLa Bella (2011 – 2016)

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The Loss Of A Dog🐾 by : Unknown
Recently, my husband & I went through one of the more excruciating experiences of our lives—the euthanasia of our beloved Shih-Tzu, Theodore. I remember making eye contact with him before he took his last breath—he flashed me a look that was an endearing blend of confusion and the reassurance that everyone was ok because we were both by his side. 
The Conversation when people who have never had a dog see their dog-owning friends mourn the loss of a pet, they probably think it’s all a bit of an overreaction; after all, it’s “just a dog.” However, those who have loved a dog know the truth: Your own pet is never “just a dog.”
Research has confirmed that for most people, the loss of a dog is, in almost every way, comparable to the loss of a human loved one. Unfortunately, there’s little in our cultural playbook—no grief rituals, no obituary in the local newspaper, no religious service—to help us get through the loss of a pet, which can make us feel more than a bit embarrassed to show too much public grief over our dead dogs.
Perhaps if people realized just how strong and intense the bond is between people and their dogs, such grief would become more widely accepted. This would greatly help dog owners to integrate the death into their lives and help them move forward.

The Silent Killer You Need To Be Ready To Fight For Your Pet : IMHA

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LoLa Bella December 31 ,2011 -August 25, 2016

 

As Positive as I have wanted this year to be, I have tone be honest and say it’s been a tough. The 2nd half of last year, I lost two relatives that were very close to me.  I found comfort in their passing, because both of the relatives had lived such long productive. And they were constantly with family and surrounded by family during their passing. I was heartbroken but I was able to get closer quickly because they both left this world they way wanted. And they had the most valuable thing on this earth, family and love.

I promised myself to make sure to make this year productive and happy. Most people that know me, knows I myself have dealt with all my life with an Immune disorder called Lupus or SLE.  I don’t worry about myself. I’ve been to hell and back with this illness. Yet I believe I am one of the more fortunate ones out of those that  suffer thru illness. This year I’m completely out of remission.  I’ve been seriousl you depressed. But out of everything in this world that can keep a smile on my face and make me feel so loved really are my pets.  Yes I have family that love me unconditionally . It’s just a difference when it’s your own pets. They are naive, highly spirited, love unconditionally. There’s never been a day that passed that I did giggle( and hard)  over some of the craziest things they do.  Ask me what I value the most in this world, the love of my pets is obviously way up there.

Well, on August 25, 2016 , my favorite baby girl , LoLa Bella, died all of the sudden. The night before death, she looked up at me and because she is always happy, I didn’t picked  up on the reason she stared at me so long and lovingly. She slept in my arms the entire night that night. I got up rhat morning to get ready for work, then I heard a thump. It was my LoLa Bella. She had fallen on the floor and couldn’t. It scared me, I didn’t even finish getting dressed. I just picked her up and ran to Veterinarian. I was crying,  fluttered and rushing and asking her ” please let mommy know you’re OK.

I felt liquid water run down my legs as I’m driving quickly to vet. I’m begging p,ease don’t die on me. When we got ,the doctor took her immediately.  And he looked scared and told me, she died. I stood there completely in shock and begged to please resuscitate her. And he is trying to say he can’t. I thought it was a bad dream and I was trying to wake up. That never came. This was real life. He examined her and realize she was ill. I said but Imy her mom. I should know when she gets ill. And that is when he tried to me about an illness in pets called  Acute Hemolytic Anemia.  I’m shocked and  for someone that has been in Pharmaceuticals for years, his words sounded foreign. I broke down and cried., cried and cried. I’m asking  how did this happen,? No one has ever mentionedone, she had a disorder.  She at the vet  , once a year, and she was only 4 years old. He said an Acute Attack  can begin then end a dog’s life within that same 24 hour time. He told me , you would not have ever known.

So after a few days of non crying, I called the vet back and  asked him to explain  to mexpress, what happened. He said he examined her and could tell by gums this is what killed her.

Matter of fact this is what helse told. Your LoLa had Immune Mediated Hemolytic Anemia. Better known as IAHA. Itso a disease that can lie dormant in the body, and then suddenly attack the red blood cells. You know , like Lupus.  He says her body attacked itself and it is hard to save the animal, because it eats away at the red blood  cells quickly. Also, the acute IMHA will kill them in 24 hours quick.  That is why LOLa Bella died so quickly. He also says some dogs are saved because they may have had the slower version of the illness. However,  even the dogs whose body is attacked at a slower the rate,  still dies. He told me there was no way you have noticed . Only unless your in medicine.  I would not have caught the red because you wouldn’t know what to look for. But if they have very pale white gums, it’s a big red sign, and you would need to bring the pet in right away.

When that conversation ended, I broke down crying  for hours. I couldn’t work , eat, or control the fact that I literally  cried for two weeks. I really thought this nightmare would end. Well it didn’t.  After two weeks of non stop crying , I decided  to research this illness, and find a support group to deal with it. This has happened to so many pet owners. The strangest thing, though is when I’m sick,( I am dealing with Lupus and R.A.), my pets in some forms is going thru the same as myself. I’ve been extremely anemic and getting weekly blood transfusions and iron infusion. I would have gladly given my medicine  to my LoLa.

 

So what is IMHA (IMMUNE MEDIATED HEMOLYTIC  ANEMIA) ?

Overview
The red blood cells serve the crucial function of carrying oxygen to the cells in the body and picking up carbon dioxide.Anemia is a condition that arises when the number of red blood cells falls below normal values, or the red blood cells function improperly. There are many diseases and conditions that can cause anemia in dogs. A low red blood cell count can be the result of blood loss, the destruction of the red blood cells, or an inadequate production of new red blood cells.

When your dog has IMHA, it means his immune system destroys its own red blood cells. Your dog’s body still produces red blood cells in the bone marrow to replace the destroyed cells, but once they are released into circulation, the immune system mistakenly recognizes them as something foreign, like a virus or infection, and destroys them. This condition is also referred to as autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA)

 

  • Causes
    There are two forms of IMHA: primary (or idiopathic), and secondary IMHA.
    With primary IMHA, your dog’s immune system mistakenly produces antibodies that attack its own red blood cells. This is the most common cause of anemia in dogs.With secondary IMHA, the surface of your dog’s red blood cells is modified by an underlying disease process, drug, or toxin. Your dog’s immune system identifies the modified red blood cells as something foreign and destroys them. When too many red blood cells are destroyed and not replaced quickly enough by bone marrow, the patient becomes anemic. Secondary IMHA can be triggered by a variety of conditions, such as:

    • Cancer
    • Infection
    • Blood parasites
    • Drug reactions
    • Snake bites
    • Exposure to certain chemicals and toxins
    • Bee stings or other allergic reactions

     

Symptoms
Symptoms maybe caused by:

  • Pale gums
  • Acting tired, weak, or listless
  • Shallow or rapid breathing
  • Faster than normal pulse
  • Lack of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Black/Tarry stools1
  • Eating dirt

These symptoms can vary from dog to dog and depend upon the underlying cause of IMHA. In some situations (mild or early IMHA), your dog may present no signs at all!

Diagnosis
When a dog is anemic, it is important to identify the underlying cause. Your veterinarian may recommend particular tests, depending on your pet’s symptoms and history. These tests may include:

  • A complete blood count to identify if your dog is anemic, and, if so, to determine whether or not his body is responding to
  • the anemia by producing new red blood cells
  • A reticulocyte count to identify if your dog’s body is responding to the anemia by making new red blood cells
  • A blood film to look for parasites and blood cell characteristics
  • Chemistry tests to evaluate kidney, liver, and pancreatic function, as well as sugar levels
  • Electrolyte tests to ensure your dog isn’t dehydrated or suffering from an electrolyte imbalance
  • Urine tests to screen for urinary tract infection and other disease, and to evaluate the ability of the kidneys to concentrate urine
  • Fecal analysis to evaluate for intestinal parasites
  • Patient-side screening for vector-borne disease
  • Specialized tests that can help identify underlying infectious disease (e.g., various titers, PCR testing)

Treatment
Treatment of IMHA depends on the severity of the condition. Your veterinarian will determine whether your dog needs intensive care or can be treated as an outpatient. Treatment often includes a variety of drugs and close monitoring of your pet’s vital signs and laboratory values. With secondary IMHA, treatment of the underlying cause is critical for recovery. Your veterinarian will recommend blood and other diagnostic tests including radiographs and ultrasound to try to determine if your pet’s IMHA is primary or secondary.

Your veterinarian may also recommend you see a specialist to help outline the best treatment plan possible, particularly if your dog requires 24-hour monitoring or specialty testing. The prognosis of a dog diagnosed with IMHA is dependent upon the underlying cause, the severity of disease, and the stage at which the disease is diagnosed. Your veterinarian can best help you understand your pet’s prognosis based on his specific diagnosis, overall health, and history.

 

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Who Ate The Cat Food, The Dog Or The Cat?

Happy New Year Everyone!  Anyone else out there has had panic attacks when they see their dog in the cat dish or the cat in the dog food ? I know I’m not the only who has worried if they have messed with their pets’ diet mistakenly. I am a worry wart when it comes to my kiddies. So I was excited when I read this article by Dr. Becker and it brought some relief. I wanted to share these words with you. Dr. Becker is a veterinarian with a wealth of knowledge and writes her own articles. so please enjoy!

 

Got Cats and Dogs? Do This in a Pinch, But Don’t Make a Habit of It
By Dr. Becker



Many pet parents – especially those with both a canine and feline in the family – wonder if there’s really a difference between dog and cat food. This question often comes up when a pet owner runs out of one type of food and wonders if there’s any harm in feeding Fido a little of Fluffy’s food, or vice versa.
Another time the question arises is when a particularly finicky dog turns up his nose at his own meal, but dives head first into the cat’s food bowl.

The answer? Generally speaking, a healthy dog or cat will not suffer one iota from eating a meal intended for the other species. If healthy Fido gobbles up a bowl of cat food while your back is turned, or you need to offer Fluffy some of Fido’s dog food in a pinch, there’s no need for concern.

Obligate Carnivore (Cat) versus Scavenging Carnivore (Dog)

The reason dog food differs from cat food is because each species requires its own nutrient profile for optimal health. Felines and canines are both carnivores (meat eaters), but with a very important distinction. Cats are obligate carnivores, whereas dogs are scavenging carnivores.

The definition of an obligate carnivore:



An obligate carnivore (or true carnivore) is an animal that must eat meat in order to thrive (Syufy 2008). They may eat other foods, such as fruits, honey, grains, and so forth, but meat must be included in their diet.

True carnivores lack the physiology required for the efficient digestion of vegetable matter, and, in fact, some carnivorous mammals eat vegetation specifically as an emetic.

The domestic cat is a prime example of an obligate carnivore, as are all of the other felids (Pierson 2008).1
Dogs are scavenging, or facultative carnivores, which in general terms means they are primarily meat-eaters, but can survive on plant material alone if necessary. The key word here is “survive.” To survive is not to thrive. To thrive is to grow vigorously. To survive means simply to stay alive.

One of the arguments for feeding dogs grain or plant-based or even vegetarian diets seems to be the distinction between obligate and scavenging carnivores. It’s assumed, since dogs aren’t strict carnivores like cats are, they can easily transition to a meatless diet. This is a dangerous misconception.

In fact, I often see dogs referred to as omnivores rather than carnivores. I strongly disagree with this assumption. Just because dogs fed plant-based diets are able to stay alive doesn’t make them omnivores. Taxonomically, dogs are in the Order Carnivora and the family Canidae along with other carnivorous mammals.

Cats Have a Unique Requirement for Animal Protein



Cats must eat animal meat and organs to meet their nutritional needs, and plant-based proteins (grains and vegetables) simply aren’t a good substitute. Cats lack the specific enzymes necessary to use plant proteins as efficiently as animal proteins.

The proteins derived from animal tissue contain a complete amino acid profile. Amino acids are the building blocks of protein. Plant-based proteins don’t contain all the amino acids critical for the health of an obligate carnivore.

Humans, who are omnivores, have the physiological ability to turn plant proteins into the missing pieces needed for a complete amino acid profile. To a very limited extent dogs can do this, but a cat’s body isn’t equipped for it whatsoever.

Cats also need much more protein in their diet than other animals. Kittens require 1.5 times more protein than puppies. Adult cats need 2 to 3 times the amount adult dogs require.

One of the reasons for this is because while other mammal species use most of the protein they consume for growth and body maintenance, cats use protein for those purposes and also as a source of energy.

When other species of animals are fed a low-protein diet, their bodies make adjustments to conserve amino acids to manage the deficit. But a cat’s body must continue to use protein even when there’s not enough in the diet, which is why protein malnutrition happens quickly in sick or injured cats, and cats suffering from anorexia.

In addition to their increased need for protein, cats also have a higher requirement for certain specific amino acids found naturally in animal tissue.

One of the amino acids missing in plants is taurine, which is found in animal muscle meat, in particular the heart and liver. Taurine deficiency causes serious health problems in cats, including cardiovascular disease and blindness. Dogs can make their own taurine.

Cats Also Have a Unique Dietary Requirement for Certain Vitamins



Cats evolved hunting a different set of prey species than dogs did, so their dietary requirements are different than dogs. Cats have a special requirement for vitamin A, which is available naturally only in animal tissue. They lack the intestinal enzymes necessary to convert B-carotene in plants to the active form of vitamin A. Vitamin A is essential for maintenance of vision, growth of bone and muscle, reproduction, and the health of epithelial tissues.

Cats also require 5 times more dietary thiamine (vitamin B1) than dogs do. A thiamine deficiency can result in a poor quality coat, loss of appetite, hunched posture, neurologic problems including seizures, and even death. Unfortunately, thiamine isn’t stable in commercial pet foods and levels drop significantly the longer the food is stored, so many cats may be deficient unless they are eating very fresh food.

Vitamin D is also essential in the diets of all mammals. Cats (and dogs) must consume vitamin D in their diet (they can’t synthesize it through their skin). The liver and fatty tissue of prey animals is rich in vitamin D.
Arachidonic acid is an omega-6 fatty acid that dogs can make themselves, but cats must get from their diet.

Cats Also Need a Moisture-Dense Diet
Another distinctive biological feature of cats is their need to get most of their water intake from the food they eat.

Domestic kitties — who evolved from desert-dwelling ancestors, after all — are not as responsive as other animals to sensations of thirst or dehydration. Unlike dogs who drink frequently from their water bowls, when fed a diet devoid of moisture (e.g., kibble), cats aren’t driven to search for another source of water to make up the difference between what their bodies require and what their diet provides.
This can result in chronic mild dehydration, a condition that will ultimately result in disease, especially of the feline lower urinary tract and kidneys.
Species-Appropriate Diets Are the Best Option for Both Dogs and Cats
Obviously, cats can’t thrive on a diet designed for dogs. And while dogs may be able to survive on cat food, it’s certainly not an optimal diet for them.

Diets designed for kitties are significantly higher in calories, protein, and fat than dogs require. A steady diet of cat food fed to even a very healthy dog may ultimately result in an overweight pet who suffers bouts of diarrhea and vomiting, and is at increased risk for pancreatitis, which can be life-threatening.

So as I said earlier, in a pinch, a healthy dog can eat a meal of cat food, or a healthy cat can eat a meal of dog food.

A better option, of course, is to offer your dog or cat species-appropriate safe human food until you can home prepare or purchase more of his regular food.

Northwest Farm Food Cooperative Recalls Frozen Raw Cat Food

 Northwest Farm Food Cooperative of Burlington, WA, is voluntarily recalling frozen raw Cat Food with the code Jul12015B due to their potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.
Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products.
Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some, or all, of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.
Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected, but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.
No pet or consumer illnesses from this product have been reported to date. However, because of their commitment to safety and quality, Northwest Farm Food Cooperative is conducting a voluntary recall of this product.
The potentially affected lots of frozen raw Cat Food were sold from our facility 1370 S. Anacortes Street Burlington, WA 98233.
The affected products are sold in 50 pound blocks and cases of six 10 pound chubs; packaged in a white plastic bag labeled Cat Food. The products affected by this recall have the production code Jul12015B and have no UPC code. The production code can be found on the outside of the case (box).
The recall was the result of a sampling done by the Food and Drug Administration which revealed that the finished product contained the bacteria. The company has ceased the production and distribution of the product as FDA and the company continues their investigation as to what caused the problem.
This recall is being made with the knowledge of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Consumers who have purchased the above lots of frozen raw Cat Food are urged to stop feeding them and return product to place of purchase for a full refund or dispose of them immediately. For further information about the recall please call (360) 757-4225 Monday through Friday from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm PST.

The New Thing : Catios.  These backyard spaces are the cat’s meow.

Article can be seen at Countryliving.com 
Courtesy of Catio Spaces
Cats love to be outside, but letting them roam around on their own can lead to the possibility of your feline friend getting dirty, lost, or worse, hurt. The latest solution? The catio (a patio, for cats—get it?). A catio is like a man cave (or a she-shed) for Whiskers: an enclosed backyard space that allows him to run around or take a nap, filled with scratching posts, shelves, stairs, and maybe even a plant or two.
Intrigued by the idea? Catios can be homemade, custom-built or bought prefabricated from companies like Cats on Deck. According to an article on Zillow, Seattle-based Catio Spaces specializes in designing and building catios with prices ranging from $2,500 to $5,000; the company also sells DIY plans for $50. While some of these catios are just simple window box-like spaces, others are incredibly elaborate, featuring several stories or tunnels connecting multiple structures to maximize feline freedom. And while the prospect of a custom catio sounds pricey, catio advocates argue that if you live in an area near a busy road or around predators like coyotes, it can save on vet bills in the long run.
Take a look at some designs below:
  
Courtesy of Zillow/


Courtesy of Zillow/Jennifer Hillman

  

Courtesy of Zillow/Jennifer Hillman


  Courtesy of Zillow/Dan Reeder


Courtesy of Zillow/Dan Reeder

It’s Still Not Too Late to Sign Up For 4th of July Pet Sitting W/ HWHD!!

 Happy Walk Happy Dog Has A Couple Of More Spots Available For The 4th Of July Week!!

                                    Call 678- 667-221 to Reserve A Spot 👣🐾👣🐾 

      Meanwhile   Check Ot These  Saftey Tips For Your Pets Around The 4th!!