Category Archives: Cat Food

BREAKING NEWS: Six Types of Pet Food Recalled

BREAKING NEWS: Hill’s Pet Nutrition of Kansas and the Food Standards Agency (FSA) has announced a recall of certain packs of its cat food pouches, all of which have shown very high levels of iron.
Iron, while essential to the diets of felines, can be damaging to the digestive system if too much is consumed, resulting in diarrhea and vomiting.
The affected products have been widely distributed, and, while Hill’s says that affected products should be off of every store shelf by now, you should check to see if you have any of these products in your possession:

       WHAT TO LOOK FOR:

                                                     

NAME: Science Plan Feline Adult Light Ocean Fish 

SKU: 2109PA 

Expiration: 07/2017


NAME: Science Plan Feline Mature Ocean Fish 

SKU: 2110PA 

Expiration: 10/2017

NAME: Science Plan Feline Adult Light Favourite Selection Multipack 

SKU: 2119V 

Expiration: 04/2017 & 10/2017

NAME: Science Plan Feline Mature Adult Favourite Selection Multipack 
SKU: 2120V 

Expiration: 08-2017

NAME: Prescription Diet Feline c/d Stress Reduced Calorie Chicken 
SKU: 2742U 

Expiration: 09/2017

NAME: Science Plan Feline Young Adult Sterilised Cat Multipack 

SKU: 3766V 

Expiration: 06/2017 & 10/2017

WHY WAS IT RECALLED?

This recall was initiated after high amounts of iron were discovered in the products listed above. It is believed that the cause of the increase in iron was due to an ingredient supplier error.
As mentioned, intaking high levels of iron can result in digestive issues, as well as other serious health issues for your feline. The symptoms of felines having excess iron in the blood (according to PetMD) come in four different stages, depending on length of time since intake, and are listed below.
WHAT ARE THE SYMTOMS ?

Stage I (0-6 hours)
Vomiting

Diarrhea

Depression

Gastrointestinal hemorrhage

Abdominal Pain

Stage II (6-24 hours)
Apparent Recovery

Stage III (12-96 hours)
Vomiting

Diarrhea

Depression

Gastrointestinal hemorrhage

Abdominal Pain

Tremors

Shock

Stage IV (2-6 weeks)
Gastrointestinal obstruction from stricture formation

It’s imperative that, should you notice any of the symptoms listed above, that you consult your veterinarian as soon as possible.
WHAT CAN YOU DO?

If you have purchased any of these products, do not feed them to your cat. According to Pet Gazette, the FSA advised consumers, “If you have bought any of the listed products…please return it to where you bought it for a full refund under Hill’s 100 percent Satisfaction Guarantee.”
If you’re having trouble locating and identifying the SKU number and the Expiration Date, please check out this statement from Hill’s Pet Nutrition.
You can also contact Hill’s Pet Nutrition at [1-800-445-5777] to inquire about alternatives, a replacement, or a refund.
If your pet is suffering from digestive issues, please do consult your veterinarian.

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Who Ate The Cat Food, The Dog Or The Cat?

Happy New Year Everyone!  Anyone else out there has had panic attacks when they see their dog in the cat dish or the cat in the dog food ? I know I’m not the only who has worried if they have messed with their pets’ diet mistakenly. I am a worry wart when it comes to my kiddies. So I was excited when I read this article by Dr. Becker and it brought some relief. I wanted to share these words with you. Dr. Becker is a veterinarian with a wealth of knowledge and writes her own articles. so please enjoy!

 

Got Cats and Dogs? Do This in a Pinch, But Don’t Make a Habit of It
By Dr. Becker



Many pet parents – especially those with both a canine and feline in the family – wonder if there’s really a difference between dog and cat food. This question often comes up when a pet owner runs out of one type of food and wonders if there’s any harm in feeding Fido a little of Fluffy’s food, or vice versa.
Another time the question arises is when a particularly finicky dog turns up his nose at his own meal, but dives head first into the cat’s food bowl.

The answer? Generally speaking, a healthy dog or cat will not suffer one iota from eating a meal intended for the other species. If healthy Fido gobbles up a bowl of cat food while your back is turned, or you need to offer Fluffy some of Fido’s dog food in a pinch, there’s no need for concern.

Obligate Carnivore (Cat) versus Scavenging Carnivore (Dog)

The reason dog food differs from cat food is because each species requires its own nutrient profile for optimal health. Felines and canines are both carnivores (meat eaters), but with a very important distinction. Cats are obligate carnivores, whereas dogs are scavenging carnivores.

The definition of an obligate carnivore:



An obligate carnivore (or true carnivore) is an animal that must eat meat in order to thrive (Syufy 2008). They may eat other foods, such as fruits, honey, grains, and so forth, but meat must be included in their diet.

True carnivores lack the physiology required for the efficient digestion of vegetable matter, and, in fact, some carnivorous mammals eat vegetation specifically as an emetic.

The domestic cat is a prime example of an obligate carnivore, as are all of the other felids (Pierson 2008).1
Dogs are scavenging, or facultative carnivores, which in general terms means they are primarily meat-eaters, but can survive on plant material alone if necessary. The key word here is “survive.” To survive is not to thrive. To thrive is to grow vigorously. To survive means simply to stay alive.

One of the arguments for feeding dogs grain or plant-based or even vegetarian diets seems to be the distinction between obligate and scavenging carnivores. It’s assumed, since dogs aren’t strict carnivores like cats are, they can easily transition to a meatless diet. This is a dangerous misconception.

In fact, I often see dogs referred to as omnivores rather than carnivores. I strongly disagree with this assumption. Just because dogs fed plant-based diets are able to stay alive doesn’t make them omnivores. Taxonomically, dogs are in the Order Carnivora and the family Canidae along with other carnivorous mammals.

Cats Have a Unique Requirement for Animal Protein



Cats must eat animal meat and organs to meet their nutritional needs, and plant-based proteins (grains and vegetables) simply aren’t a good substitute. Cats lack the specific enzymes necessary to use plant proteins as efficiently as animal proteins.

The proteins derived from animal tissue contain a complete amino acid profile. Amino acids are the building blocks of protein. Plant-based proteins don’t contain all the amino acids critical for the health of an obligate carnivore.

Humans, who are omnivores, have the physiological ability to turn plant proteins into the missing pieces needed for a complete amino acid profile. To a very limited extent dogs can do this, but a cat’s body isn’t equipped for it whatsoever.

Cats also need much more protein in their diet than other animals. Kittens require 1.5 times more protein than puppies. Adult cats need 2 to 3 times the amount adult dogs require.

One of the reasons for this is because while other mammal species use most of the protein they consume for growth and body maintenance, cats use protein for those purposes and also as a source of energy.

When other species of animals are fed a low-protein diet, their bodies make adjustments to conserve amino acids to manage the deficit. But a cat’s body must continue to use protein even when there’s not enough in the diet, which is why protein malnutrition happens quickly in sick or injured cats, and cats suffering from anorexia.

In addition to their increased need for protein, cats also have a higher requirement for certain specific amino acids found naturally in animal tissue.

One of the amino acids missing in plants is taurine, which is found in animal muscle meat, in particular the heart and liver. Taurine deficiency causes serious health problems in cats, including cardiovascular disease and blindness. Dogs can make their own taurine.

Cats Also Have a Unique Dietary Requirement for Certain Vitamins



Cats evolved hunting a different set of prey species than dogs did, so their dietary requirements are different than dogs. Cats have a special requirement for vitamin A, which is available naturally only in animal tissue. They lack the intestinal enzymes necessary to convert B-carotene in plants to the active form of vitamin A. Vitamin A is essential for maintenance of vision, growth of bone and muscle, reproduction, and the health of epithelial tissues.

Cats also require 5 times more dietary thiamine (vitamin B1) than dogs do. A thiamine deficiency can result in a poor quality coat, loss of appetite, hunched posture, neurologic problems including seizures, and even death. Unfortunately, thiamine isn’t stable in commercial pet foods and levels drop significantly the longer the food is stored, so many cats may be deficient unless they are eating very fresh food.

Vitamin D is also essential in the diets of all mammals. Cats (and dogs) must consume vitamin D in their diet (they can’t synthesize it through their skin). The liver and fatty tissue of prey animals is rich in vitamin D.
Arachidonic acid is an omega-6 fatty acid that dogs can make themselves, but cats must get from their diet.

Cats Also Need a Moisture-Dense Diet
Another distinctive biological feature of cats is their need to get most of their water intake from the food they eat.

Domestic kitties — who evolved from desert-dwelling ancestors, after all — are not as responsive as other animals to sensations of thirst or dehydration. Unlike dogs who drink frequently from their water bowls, when fed a diet devoid of moisture (e.g., kibble), cats aren’t driven to search for another source of water to make up the difference between what their bodies require and what their diet provides.
This can result in chronic mild dehydration, a condition that will ultimately result in disease, especially of the feline lower urinary tract and kidneys.
Species-Appropriate Diets Are the Best Option for Both Dogs and Cats
Obviously, cats can’t thrive on a diet designed for dogs. And while dogs may be able to survive on cat food, it’s certainly not an optimal diet for them.

Diets designed for kitties are significantly higher in calories, protein, and fat than dogs require. A steady diet of cat food fed to even a very healthy dog may ultimately result in an overweight pet who suffers bouts of diarrhea and vomiting, and is at increased risk for pancreatitis, which can be life-threatening.

So as I said earlier, in a pinch, a healthy dog can eat a meal of cat food, or a healthy cat can eat a meal of dog food.

A better option, of course, is to offer your dog or cat species-appropriate safe human food until you can home prepare or purchase more of his regular food.

Northwest Farm Food Cooperative Recalls Frozen Raw Cat Food

 Northwest Farm Food Cooperative of Burlington, WA, is voluntarily recalling frozen raw Cat Food with the code Jul12015B due to their potential to be contaminated with Salmonella.
Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products.
Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some, or all, of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.
Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected, but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.
No pet or consumer illnesses from this product have been reported to date. However, because of their commitment to safety and quality, Northwest Farm Food Cooperative is conducting a voluntary recall of this product.
The potentially affected lots of frozen raw Cat Food were sold from our facility 1370 S. Anacortes Street Burlington, WA 98233.
The affected products are sold in 50 pound blocks and cases of six 10 pound chubs; packaged in a white plastic bag labeled Cat Food. The products affected by this recall have the production code Jul12015B and have no UPC code. The production code can be found on the outside of the case (box).
The recall was the result of a sampling done by the Food and Drug Administration which revealed that the finished product contained the bacteria. The company has ceased the production and distribution of the product as FDA and the company continues their investigation as to what caused the problem.
This recall is being made with the knowledge of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Consumers who have purchased the above lots of frozen raw Cat Food are urged to stop feeding them and return product to place of purchase for a full refund or dispose of them immediately. For further information about the recall please call (360) 757-4225 Monday through Friday from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm PST.

Primal Pet Foods Issues Recall of Raw Cat Food

 

Primal Pet Foods, a California-based pet food manufacturer, has announced the voluntary recall of a single lot of Feline Turkey Raw Frozen Cat Food due to reports of low thiamine levels in the food.

 

According to a department release, the FDA tested the product after receiving a consumer complaint concerning 3-pound bags of Primal Pet Foods Feline Turkey Raw Frozen Formula. After testing, the FDA notified Primal Pet Foods that the testing of two bags of this lot showed a low thiamine level.

 

The lot involved in the recall is:

 

Primal Pet Foods Feline Turkey Raw Frozen Formula 3-pound bag 

(UPC# 8 50334-00414 0) 

Best By date 060815 

Production Code – B22

 

Only the product with the above best-by date and production code is included in the cat food recall. Consumers are advised to check the production code on the back of the Primal Pet Foods bag to determine if the product has been recalled.

 

Cats fed diets low in thiamine for an extended period may be at risk for developing a thiamine deficiency. Symptoms of an affected cat can be gastrointestinal or neurological in nature, and early signs of thiamine deficiencymay include decreased appetite, salivation, vomiting, and weight loss. In advanced cases, neurologic signs can develop, which may include ventriflexion (bending towards the floor) of the neck, wobbly walking, circling, falling, and seizures.

 

Consumers who purchased 3-pound bags of the recalled cat food are advised to stop feeding it to their cats and call Primal Pet Foods at 1-866-566-4652Monday through Friday, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm (PST). Those with cats which have consumed food from the recalled lot and which are displaying symptoms mentioned above are urged to contact their veterinarian. If treated promptly, thiamine deficiency is typically reversible.