Monthly Archives: March 2017

The Loss Of A Dog(Pet)

Hello Everyone,
I hope everyone is having a blessed new year. I haven’t been able to write like I used to because I have a corporate job and running this business at the same time.  Although my year has been okay, one issue I’m mourning is the loss of one my pets.  People who know me, knows I’m energetic and generallly a happy disposition. Right now, I don’t feel that way I never show my depressed to them.  Writing this blog helps me to release my feelings and gain more closure.  Yesterday I read about a cat that had been kidnapped, beaten and tortured. He walked home on broken paws to get home and then died.   Even writing this my heart is so broken over what this cat experienced  as well as the owners. I won’t go into much detail because it’s extremely painful to read about. Today I ran across a blog written by unknown , that helps people understand the feelings people go through when their pets die. I want to share it with this community whose love of animals are even stronger than mine.

LoLa Bella (2011 – 2016)

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The Loss Of A Dog🐾 by : Unknown
Recently, my husband & I went through one of the more excruciating experiences of our lives—the euthanasia of our beloved Shih-Tzu, Theodore. I remember making eye contact with him before he took his last breath—he flashed me a look that was an endearing blend of confusion and the reassurance that everyone was ok because we were both by his side. 
The Conversation when people who have never had a dog see their dog-owning friends mourn the loss of a pet, they probably think it’s all a bit of an overreaction; after all, it’s “just a dog.” However, those who have loved a dog know the truth: Your own pet is never “just a dog.”
Research has confirmed that for most people, the loss of a dog is, in almost every way, comparable to the loss of a human loved one. Unfortunately, there’s little in our cultural playbook—no grief rituals, no obituary in the local newspaper, no religious service—to help us get through the loss of a pet, which can make us feel more than a bit embarrassed to show too much public grief over our dead dogs.
Perhaps if people realized just how strong and intense the bond is between people and their dogs, such grief would become more widely accepted. This would greatly help dog owners to integrate the death into their lives and help them move forward.